And Now Back to Me: Forced Self-Absorption

Hmm, I realized I haven’t been saying much about myself these days: Me, My Diabetes, How’s It Going? And that’s what it’s all about for each of us, isn’t it? Staying focused on ourselves — our BG control, our exercise and diet, our well-being.
No more diving into that big work project and forgetting yourself. Just ask Gilbert on that one; he writes, “Don’t be an idiot, it only takes a few hours for diabetes…

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The Doctor is IN

Just a note to say that Dr. Bill Quick, a 30-year veteran endocrinologist himself, and editor of the excellent online resource DiabetesMonitor, has been diagnosed with diabetes! He came in with an A1c of 11.1 and initial BG of 293 (!)
He’s starting insulin and “checking zillions of BGs daily,” as chronicled on his blog. He’s also planning to see a new endocrinologist of his own very soon. Now there’s a twist! Can’t wait to…

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An Oral History of Diabetes, Death, and Software

I’m horribly behind in the MailBag Department. Here are some wonderful, sad, and interesting bits recently passed along that I’d like to share:
* An Oral History of Diabetes is a project like no other. This recently completed UK Website features audio recordings of the life-stories of 50 people diagnosed with diabetes between 1927 and 1997 (mostly the bad old days for diabetes). The interviewees talk candidly about how they lived and what it was…

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More Diabetes Economics: What the…?!

Looking over the sources for my last post, an anvil hit me: according to World Health Organization (WHO) estimates here, on a global basis, 45% of health budgets is spent on diabetes and diabetes-related illnesses. That would make diabetes, by most counts, the world’s leading disease, overshadowing even AIDS in sheer scope and costs!! Think about it.
OH BUT WAIT: That site features a dreaded Statistical Typo, in which all short dashes have mysteriously disappeared……

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Economic Force: Salute Diabetica!

Last night my husband said: “There are more diabetics in this country than there are people in The Netherlands.” Now this may not mean that much to you, but we lived in that country for nearly three years. My second child was born there. And I’m picturing all of the 16.5 million bike-riding, cheese-eating masses pressing buttons on their insulin pumps and priming their pen needles, toting monitors and counting carbs.
No, really. Imagine, an…

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