Life with Diabetes

Healthcare is Hot, But is it Consumer- Driven?

New cover story of BusinessWeek: Healthcare is driving the US economy.  Healthcare!  1.7 million new jobs since 2001.  The main region of job growth is what BW calls the “Health Belt,” stretching from Maine to Pennsylvania, across the Midwest, and then down South.
Amazing.  The article features former insurance and appliance salesfolks who now have lucrative jobs in nursing.  And small towns that thrive off the growth of local hospitals and clinics.
The question of…

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Laughing, with Needles

So the folks over at dLife.com finally got around to posting my feature article on Laura Menninger, aka the “Glucose Goddess” — funny lady with diabetes extraordinaire.  Again, they placed the article in an incredibly difficult spot to find, with a long, unwieldy URL that you would never remember.  (So use the link above instead).
And here’s the photo that should have accompanied the article, rather than that boring headshot of me.  What were they…

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Chair-less Classrooms to Fight Obesity

While we’re on the subject of Back to School, here’s a tip just in from the friendly skies (i.e. I read it on the plane last week): researchers from the renowned Mayo Clinic have designed what they believe to be the first classroom without chairs.  Instead, “students write standing at podiums on wheels or take spelling tests sprawled on carpet squares.”
Mayo obesity researcher Dr. James Levine studies the connection between everyday movement and weight.…

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The LillyforLife Achievement Award for Diabetes Journalism (!)

I’ve never been one to win things in this life. Once, as a student at an LA Times journalism conference, I won a sun visor as a door prize. That was about it. So you can imagine how floored and honored I was to receive an email last week from a manager in Eli Lilly’s global communications group informing me that I have been selected as the winner of this year’s LillyforLife Achievement Award for…

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Information Bias in Research, Uh-huh

While we’re on the subject of patient studies, here’s another thing: “regular” research with real live patients is not without its faults, no sir. By that I mean to say that even though studies using real, live people may seem quite preferable to computer simulation, things are not always as forthright as they seem.
This month’s Diabetes Voice magazine from the International Diabetes Foundation (IDF) features an extremely interesting piece about information bias in research:…

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