AmyT

Diabetes Quizzing

So ya think that just because you take your meds and count your carbs and visit your endo that you know something, do ya? Well now, I’ve discovered there are plenty of online quizzes to put that theory to the test.
Start at the Online Quiz Center. I tried my hand at diabetic neuropathy, and discovered that the cause for this “family of nerve disorders” is “unknown.” Hmmph.
On the lighter side, try the Accu-Check…

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Giggles for Diabetes, As Directed

I’ve written about this before, but can never resist additional evidence that laughter is the best medicine.
This time a researcher from the Foundation for the Advancement of International Science actually tested the hypothesis on people with diabetes — to see whether laughter could influence blood glucose level. On one day he took 19 diabetes patients to “a monotonous lecture (40 minutes) without humorous content.” The next day he took them to a 40-minute comedy…

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‘Round Here

It’s pretty nutty sometimes. Children not only bring a ton of love and cuteness into your lilfe, but major chaos as well. My “middle child” in particular is ONE OF A KIND (caps intentional). I call her “Volume Girl” for reasons that are self-explanatory. She’s the one most curious about my diabetes, and in her own eccentric way, she’s the most protective of me.
I’d love to post big splashy photos of her here, but…

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Diabetes Shirts for a Cause

I get a surprising number of hits here from people searching the Web for “diabetes T-shirts.” I suppose if I were more enterprising, I’d sell them myself. Nah. My experience with retail is limited to the receiving end So instead I’m sharing a tip on two highly stylish looks that benefit the D-cause:
* For the active types, consider a cool cycling jersey from Team Type1, those incredible cyclists peddling to raise $1,000,000 for JDRF…

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The Clay Feet of Research

Looking back on it now, I guess what I really learned in graduate school was that you can’t trust research. You really can’t. There’s so much variation in methods and methodology — and so little true objectivity — that essentially we can and do interpret data to mean anything we’d like it to mean.
This has lots to do with relying on correlations, i.e. the patients who had the most X factor also developed the…

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