AmyT

Update: MiniMed’s Stand-Alone Guardian CGM Approved by the FDA

Ah, the rumor has panned out! I read just now that Medtronic has indeed secured FDA approval for its stand-alone Guardian RT continuous glucose sensor. This is the sensor/transmitter portion of the MiniMed Paradigm system — the Guardian combined with the company’s 522/722 pump — that has been shipping as a combo unit since June 19.
A few details, per diabetes consultancy Close Concerns:
* This wireless Guardian sensor won’t be available to patients till…

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Rumor Has It…

I’ve had a few quite intriguing anonymous tips in the last few days.
No. 1: The updated, and much upgraded, version of MiniMed’s Guardian RT continuous monitor is possibly approved — or a hair from approval — by the FDA. Apparently version 2.0 is “totally kick-ass,” sporting every feature you can think of and some you probably never would’ve dreamed of. Ready for nationwide roll-out by the end of this year?
If this is true,…

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A Brassy Little Game

“Would you rather spend two days in the boys’ locker room, or get slimed?” my 9yr-old asks.
“Would You Rather…?” is her new game.
“Um, slimed, I guess,” I reply, screwing up my face (as I lurch around the kitchen, trying to beat my own Personal Best at emptying the dishwasher).
“Would you rather get 100 cupcakes with icing — even if you can’t eat them — or get your diabetes cured?”
“Oh, easy,” I…

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“Metabolic Syndrome” Label Misleads…

Maybe you already knew that “Metabolic Syndrome,” otherwise known as “Syndrome X” is not a “real” disorder. Really.
In case you’re not familiar, Metabolic Syndrome is defined as the presence of at least three of these five factors:
1) fasting glucose above 110 (above 126 is the criteria for overt diabetes)
2) high blood pressure (top number above 130 or the bottom number above 85)
3) triglycerides above 150
4) HDL cholesterol below 40 in…

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Type 1 Diabetes in Children: Blame the Baby Cereal?

According to a symposium titled “Nature vs. Nurture in Type 1 Diabetes” at last month’s ADA Conference, you can forget this conflict: It’s both!
Latest research results show that the “concordance rate” of Type 1 in twins is only 25 to 50%, leading to lots of speculation about how environmental factors affect poeple who are genetically predisposed to the disease. And what factors could those be? Why, baby cereal, of course!
A speaker on “gut…

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