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4 Responses

  1. Mike Ratrie
    Mike Ratrie December 19, 2013 at 9:00 am | | Reply

    Interesting comments to be sure. Since we are being pushed into a model where insurers will have an even greater impact on PWDs ability to receive adequate (if not state of the art) care, I can only hope that the exciting innovations being researched by Joslin and others will have the greater effect.

  2. David
    David December 19, 2013 at 10:04 am | | Reply

    Whew, a lot of ideas in this post. I suppose insurance company actuaries have already factored in the cost of covering the chronically sick into their premiums. Of course, a single-payer system would be the ultimate way to capture the long-term benefits of treatment of diabetics in terms of prevention and pump and CGM devices. Absolutely, the FDA should be flexible in allowing incremental improvements in devices and how they share data without imposing undue regulatory expense and delay.

  3. John
    John December 19, 2013 at 6:01 pm | | Reply

    I fail to see the connection between any of what he said and the bedside. We still inject sub q and are asked to check our blood glucose level an in ordinate amount of times. Can we cut through the bull and get to a place where real innovation moves beyond burdening the patient and beyond injections or catheters? Is the technology and brain power just not there? Can we move beyond headlines and get real! I’ve heard it for 31 years!

  4. Caroline Yeager, M.D.
    Caroline Yeager, M.D. December 19, 2013 at 11:32 pm | | Reply

    Now for the fun news. The WH just asked Big Insure to offer catastrophic care policies to those 5M who lost their policies in 2013. Of course, they will be about the same as the Bronze level because they still have to include maternity care, yada, yada. So much for chronic care in the mean time. And since they are catastropic care, there will be no subsidies. I think that means they are still unaffordable, too. Good Grief!

    Maybe a large organization for DM patients can form a bargaining cartel to negotiate a price for our supplies and devices.

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