Advertisement

9 Responses

  1. David
    David October 3, 2013 at 5:10 am | | Reply

    Lovin’ the updates, thank you. The minimal post-meal spike via inhaled insulin is very interesting. Not sure why pumps don’t already automatically calculate a Super Bolus to accomplish a similar effect.

  2. Tim Steinert
    Tim Steinert October 3, 2013 at 10:49 am | | Reply

    I’m quite interested to know WHY men might statistically have better blood sugar control. One thing I’ve also been wondering lately (after Will D. answered a question about which Diabetes is “worse”) is if there are significantly more male T1s or female T1s. It would have no bearing on the aforementioned study but would be interesting to know.

  3. Judi
    Judi October 3, 2013 at 12:43 pm | | Reply

    I’m missing how you set the dose for inhaled insulin. The video said it contained 10 units, but what if you don’t need that much? Also, do you get less if you inhale less deeply?

  4. John
    John October 3, 2013 at 1:22 pm | | Reply

    Nothing mentioned inspires. Once again, all the tech is sub-q, over priced tech. The inhaled insulin has not caught on and most likely won’t. I agree with the poster who asked how do you dial in the correct dose.

    The fact the Europeans are adopting the FDA device standards proves they are not up to snuff.

    Where is encapsulation? Xenotransplantation? Or, is that only for text books like everything else T1 research related.

    How many T1′s will take the ultra fast acting insulin and end it? Depression and T1 is a real concern. I wouldn’t be so fast to buy into anything ultra fast acting.

    1. ron
      ron October 3, 2013 at 7:02 pm | | Reply

      The video clearly states that the basic dose is equivalent to 3 iu in the body, not 10. Someone who needs more can load another and inhale again, it takes seconds. The comment that someone would use this to do themselves harm is a false argument and not too funny. They could do the same thing with a needle. The benefit of the ultra fast acting insulin is that it signals the liver, unlike novolog, and is in and out much faster. This combination causes less stacking and less severe hypos. Seems like a no brainer, especially for type II’s that aren’t having success or worried about the future side effects of many of the new drugs.

    2. God
      God October 8, 2013 at 10:24 am | | Reply

      Are you a troll or just bitter you aren’t cured like they said we would be 20+ years ago.

      MP3 players didn’t catch on until the iPod, perhaps inhaled insulin will be the same or as this study is showing can be modeled different and have a significant impact.

      So you won’t be fast to buy into ultra-rapid acting, how long did it take for you to get onto rapid acting? If someone does die while they are on ultra-rapid acting will you just say no? The benefits far outweigh the risks especially given the improvements on CGM.

      Transplantation has been shown to not work as well as being extremely costly by not only monetary standards but also time. An implantable pump works much better than a sub-q pump, but there is an infrastructure and skill level needed to implant them (you could also go the Roche Diaport route which I think is awesome).

      There are of course tons of great ideas in pipelines all around the world, but in the end only a very small percent will be feasible. Some will be game changers, others incremental improvements with the latter typically being the more feasible of the two.

  5. jack jerries
    jack jerries October 4, 2013 at 7:44 am | | Reply

    Speaking of devices, anyone have a view on the EndoBarrier and if this could be for real?

  6. Why the Medtronic 530G is NOT an Artifical Pancreas

    [...] this video about “inhaled insulin” to supplement the AP is [...]

  7. CGM: Closing the Loop | MedTech Blog
    CGM: Closing the Loop | MedTech Blog October 7, 2013 at 2:57 am |

    [...] management tools. The ultimate shape of the artificial pancreas may even provide some surprises. As reported by Diabetes Mine, the JDRF and Sansum Diabetes Research Institute are developing a somewhat [...]

Leave a Reply