14 Responses

  1. Matt Baran
    Matt Baran July 30, 2012 at 7:34 am | | Reply

    I had to chuckle when I read the beginning of this one. I am about to take of to my 3 month check up with the endo and am finding a book for the hour long wait I will have.

  2. Sysy
    Sysy July 30, 2012 at 8:07 am | | Reply

    Great post, Allison. My experience with having a health coach was so amazing it made me want to be a health coach. If I could do for people what my coach did for me…well, it just doesn’t get any better than that :)

  3. Michael Ratrie
    Michael Ratrie July 30, 2012 at 10:09 am | | Reply

    While I do agree that there is a place for coaching in both life and D life, there is a lot of overlap between a coach, educator and a therapist (psycho or otherwise). I totally disagree with Sherry Gaba’s explanation as to the role of a psychotherapist, if I read her view correctly.

  4. Tim
    Tim July 30, 2012 at 1:47 pm | | Reply

    I am very fortunate to have some of the finest diabetic care in the country (Benaroya in Seattle). The most important thing for me is that I have to WRITE DOWN my concerns to have them addressed by my internist or endo. I just don’t remember things well anymore. They already know I’m serious about my care.

    If I’m going to stumble it’s because I’m depressed, which is much more in the purview of a psychologist or counselor. The team approach only works if you’re actively engaged in your care, so if you do have a good team–they desperately need a captain–You!

  5. Nice Diabetes
    Nice Diabetes July 30, 2012 at 3:34 pm | | Reply

    I find that researching online plays the roles of a “diabetes coach” so Im not convinced this is a new channel we need to spend even more money on.
    The value you receive from asking questions on forums and getting to hear other peoples response is the same experience you seem to be able to gain from such a coach.
    I recently moved back to Australia and the cost of being a diabetic here is so high (compared to what I didn’t pay for in Europe) so I don’t think I could justify the expense for something I think I can get the same value from online.

  6. Riva
    Riva July 30, 2012 at 5:17 pm | | Reply

    Wellcoaches, the coaching organization through which I became a health coach, is becoming one of the highest ranking orgs in health coaching. Allison you hit the nail on the head when you said in your comment that educators are about teaching and imparting information, therapy is for analyzing the past and coaching is about designing your way forward. And most people can’t do that alone or by reading blogs or chatting on social media.

  7. riva
    riva July 30, 2012 at 6:02 pm | | Reply

    Wellcoaches is one of the premiere health coaching organizations, through which I became a coach. And Allison, you have it exactly right: A CDE will teach and inform, therapy will have you analyze the past and a coach will work in partnership with you to help you design your way forward. And frankly, you can’t get that from reading blogs or participating in social media sites.

  8. HopeW.
    HopeW. July 31, 2012 at 12:36 pm | | Reply

    In the 40 years I’ve been a T1D, I do not believe I have ever had a “team” of healthcare workers. I have had doctors telling me what I “should” be doing, but no help with practical application of that. I’ve found a diabetes support group at a local hospital, but have found that is more of s social group, not a practical tool for dealing with diabetes. I am floundering here, my A1c is steadily rising as I age and hit menopause, and I am not finding help or answers. I already have complications from T1D and at this point only envision my complications becoming more complicated :(

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  11. Madelyn Griffith-Haynie
    Madelyn Griffith-Haynie August 24, 2012 at 1:17 am | | Reply

    FYI, Doing some updating, I just back-linked this page to an older coaching post on my ADD-focused WordPress blog [article: 10 Step ADD Coaching -- use the search box]. If I link it to other coaching posts, will it work to simply ping you for notification?
    ———– NOW for my comment ———–>

    DEAR Allison – God bless and good luck. This is a WONDERFUL post and, IMHO, a much needed niche. (I am not a PWD, but had 2 sibs with Type I, sister “brittle”, brother seemingly not – neither survived it).

    Reading your post, it seems as if you are in much the same place I was in as I founded the ADD Coaching field when I launched the original ADD-specific coaching curriculum: a “maverick.”

    Even though I was the 2nd grad of the world’s first Personal and Professional Coaching curriculum, and a senior member of their trainer team for their first 7 years, (CoachU – name at time), and EVEN though I was a founding member of ICF, and one of the pioneer coaches who helped develop the coaching schools standards for the certification process — I got little support and more than a little push-back from my fellow coaches for going “outside their box” with coaching for Attentional Spectrum issues. It was tough.

    Most people, even coaches (sad to say), are uncomfortable with “different” – so wheels turn frustratingly slowly. Things ARE changing, but you may well feel like the odd duck on the chicken ranch much of the time.

    Don’t let that stop you.

    Don’t let “lack of money for services” comments dilute your resolve either. Only those who are coach-aware can really understand the difference it can make in their lives – FAR beyond what they can get for free on the I-net.

    Charging for services rendered may seem unconscionable to some (at first), and others won’t be in a financial position to hire a coach. Still, never doubt that it is an honorable expectation to “do WELL doing good” — you can’t help ANYBODY effectively when you have to work a second job to support your coaching habit! (Trust me on that one ::grin::)

    I got those comments too, for some time, even tho’ Ned Hallowell (MD and ADD author of note) OFTEN said that “coaching is the single most effective tool for ADD self-management.”

    “Fast” forward, 25 years later: google ADD Coach or ADHD coach and check out how many pages return. Your niche will follow a similar trajectory, I have no doubt, and perhaps your path will have been worn a bit smoother by those who came before you.

    I’m sure you know that you have not chosen an easy path for yourself – the world tends to be BRUTAL to front-runners. BUT – if you can stay the distance, you WILL change lives, and you will have left a legacy that will make it all worth it in the end – if it doesn’t kill you first (only half kidding!)

    Search for “What Kind of World do you Want? on ADDandSoMuchMore.com if you need a hit of inspiration.

    It may take longer than you’d like to get my attention (I am CRAZY/busy, so tough to catch) – but if I can support you in some small way, SING OUT LOUISE. My heart and prayers are with you.

    YOU GO GIRL!

    Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CMC, SCAC, MCC
    - cofounder of the ADD Coaching field -
    (blogging at ADDandSoMuchMore and ADDerWorld – dot com)
    “It takes a village to transform a world!”

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