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19 Responses

  1. Sysy
    Sysy January 3, 2012 at 6:13 am | | Reply

    Thanks for this post! The way I see it, labels not being 100% accurate is the same as the fact that each time we give insulin, a different varying amount isn’t absorbed. So I try to not eat foods that even have a label (typically processed food) and I try to keep insulin intake low in order to minimize the margins of error. Those two things take care of a lot because let’s face it, stress, pain, exercise, etc, all cause enough blood sugar deviation.

  2. Scott S
    Scott S January 3, 2012 at 6:19 am | | Reply

    All of this is yet another reason why the notion of genuine glycemic control is more wishful thinking than being based in reality. It is for this reason that most PWDs who have lived with diabetes for any time view the notion of “control” as much of an art as it is science.

  3. Allison
    Allison January 3, 2012 at 6:59 am | | Reply

    I agree with Sysy 100% – when I eat less processed, more REAL foods, my blood sugars are so much better and I feel amazing.

  4. Mary Fairweather Dexter
    Mary Fairweather Dexter January 3, 2012 at 7:30 am | | Reply

    The new labeling system is worthless for PWDs because Sugar has replaced Carbs and they aren’t the same thing. Sugar has all sorts of things deducted (e.g. sugar alcohol) which we dare not subtract if we want an accurate carb count to plug into a pump or use with a bolus ratio. Using only a fraction of the total carbs to calculate insulin dosage will guarantee horribly high numbers post-meal, which equals several hours wasted trying to bring them down.

  5. Lee Ann Thill
    Lee Ann Thill January 3, 2012 at 7:34 am | | Reply

    Great topic, and I really appreciate the research and resources cited. While I’m ordinarily glad to at least have a label, it is really frustrating to eat an entire meal or snack of foods, all with labels, count it correctly, and still get an off-target BG reading. In addition to all the numerous variables that might account for a high or low, it makes me mad that carb labeling, which could be accurate, isn’t. It continuously astounds me that the government allows the food industry to self-police itself as much as it does.

    At least food labels are still good for making art projects though ;)

    1. ellen cooper RN CDE
      ellen cooper RN CDE February 14, 2012 at 12:57 pm | | Reply

      It should be no surprise that FDA can’t do the job it’s supposed to do. Regulators have seen their budgets and staff cut as they take more and more blame as “job killers” by politicians with ulterior (pro-industry) motives. This is why we need regulation, to protect the public.

  6. susan f
    susan f January 3, 2012 at 8:28 am | | Reply

    Helpful hint: most food labels are fairly accurate, in my experience, it’s the portion sizes that aren’t. Ie. you get a package of hamburger buns, and one might weight 59g and another might weigh 45g. The nutritional info will say something like “serving size, 1 bun (49g). For prepackaged food, even bread, I often weigh it to verify the portion size. If the weight of a portion size disappears off the labels, I’ll be devastated.

    1. Andrew
      Andrew July 21, 2012 at 2:48 pm | | Reply

      Susan F: Can you provide evidence to your statement that “most food labels are fairly accurate”? What does “fairly” mean? is it within the 20% accuracy as the FDA suggests or even higher? Do you have a citation to show tests that have been done to demonstrate that they are “fairly accurate”? or is simply a gut feeling or trust? I am curious. Thank you.

  7. Nathan
    Nathan January 3, 2012 at 8:39 am | | Reply

    Yes, it confirms that we can’t depend on the manufactures to give us accurate counts. I have found that stuff that should be fine, low-carb fare is far from it. From experience, I have had to eliminate foods that looked perfect on paper (label).
    Many times, the results we get with certain foods are better indicators than the label.
    I operate like Sysy, small doses of carb and insulin to keep things predictable.

  8. Nyx
    Nyx January 3, 2012 at 9:46 am | | Reply

    I haven’t found the labels to be that out of whack, then again I’m in canada so many it’s slight different here (or not I really can’t say) but I also don’t eat a lot of processed foods if I can well help it (not fond of the sodium counts to start with). It would be very nice if the food industry was subject to actual testing for what they produce since they are directly linked to people’s health in general (as in if they are giving wrong info, then even if you are following the labels its not being healthy for you).

    But like another poster I also measure everything that goes into me, and ya I have found that breads and other baked items not to be accurate – but I also know that such items always say on the labels apx serving size or something similor which is what is giving them the lee way (and many people over look when reading the label) that and many people still seem to think a single serving is a while can when in most cases a can of something = two servings.

  9. Lillian
    Lillian January 3, 2012 at 9:54 am | | Reply

    I’m with Sysy and Allison, too! A simple electronic kitchen scale lets me weigh things quickly, and I find cooking enjoyable, so it’s more relaxing than stressful to gather locally grown produce each Sunday night to make lunches and prep dinners for the first half of the week (my husband does the second half).

    The fewer foods with labels that I eat, the better that I feel generally. And since there’s more and more evidence each day that the FDA is inefficient and ineffective, I feel more comfortable knowing the people who grow my food, instead of wondering who at the government agency cursorily stamped approval on a package.

  10. Pamela Snook
    Pamela Snook January 3, 2012 at 1:39 pm | | Reply

    Okay, this is about cans and processed food. And, it’s a very good point. But, lets talk hot lunch at school. Check out the governments web site. Is there a carb count anywhere? Do any of the schools provide any type of carb count for the kids who have free lunch and are insulin dependent? They don’t here!

    1. Missfrizzly
      Missfrizzly January 6, 2012 at 12:14 pm | | Reply

      Sorry, meant to direct my comment to you – see my comment above regarding hot lunch.

  11. Missfrizzly
    Missfrizzly January 6, 2012 at 12:13 pm | | Reply

    The hot lunch vendor should have a dietitian who can provide you with nutrition info, including carb counts. Ask your school nurse for help in obtaining this info ( I’m a school nurse and when I need nutrition info for a student, I contact the food service company and they are able to provide me with nutrition info for every item on the menu). I believe schools are required to provide the info…

    1. Pamela Snook
      Pamela Snook January 8, 2012 at 11:32 pm | | Reply

      I discovered this problem while working as a school nurse. It may not be the same everywhere, but where I was it was an issue.

  12. Jim Purdy
    Jim Purdy January 30, 2012 at 4:24 pm | | Reply

    So BigFood is misleading us?

    Horrors! Who would thunk it?

    (Sarcasm off now.)

  13. Pagg Supplement
    Pagg Supplement March 1, 2012 at 12:22 am | | Reply

    Yes I am Trusted on Nutrition labels. But its also true that labels are not always accurate. Anyway share a very nice information. Thanks for share this.

  14. BETTY BLUME
    BETTY BLUME December 28, 2012 at 6:32 am | | Reply

    THE WHOLE WHEAT COUNCIL PEMITS HIGH LEVELS OF WHITE FOUR IN THE PRODUCTS BEARING THEIR RECOMMENDATIONS .ITS BEEN AWHILE SINCE I SPOKE WITH THEM, BUT I THINK ITS MORE THAN HALF WHITE AND STILL THE PACKAGE ADVERTIZES WHOLE GRAIN. ECCE PANIS, INC. A NATIONAL DISTRIBUTOR OUT OF BRUNSWICK NJ……HAS A PROMINATE SECOND INGREDIENT LABELS LISTING WHOLE GRAIN FIRST AND A SMALL OFFICIAL INGREDIENTS LABLE LIST WHITE FLOUR FIRST with all the susal incorrect multigrain, eat well, good source of fiber BS and never mind the percentages. A&P has a wholewheat bread from Canada that is excellent and I hope really whole wheat.

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