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14 Responses

  1. al
    al August 1, 2011 at 6:59 am | | Reply

    This is what I want to see. http://www.pancreum.com

  2. kim
    kim August 1, 2011 at 7:16 am | | Reply

    This is all really interesting. Is there anything in the works for those of us with Type 1 or who may be more insulin sensitive? (example-basal rates ranging from 0.15-0.30 units/hour, I:C 1:20-25).

  3. riva
    riva August 1, 2011 at 7:49 am | | Reply

    Kelly, I’m with Kim. I find it funny that the focus of much of this patch/pump work now seems aimed at type 2s. The idea of 2 units of rapid acting insulin being the lowest you can dose at meals makes it unusable for so many type 1s.

  4. kelly close
    kelly close August 1, 2011 at 9:24 am | | Reply

    hi all – for SURE, this is a piece focused primarily on type 2 patients and alternatives for them to take insulin more easily … there are huge financial and quality of life reasons why this is critical. of COURSE, we are so interested in the AP here at diaTribe too – see Gary Scheiner’s last piece on this, which wasn’t about the technology as much as the hormones that all of us are without – it’s not just insulin! http://www.diatribe.us/issues/34/thinking-like-a-pancreas.php

    We don’t have data on this, but our guess is that insulin-sensitive patients / pumpers are becoming more and more common, especially as people look for tighter control, and even as they take (albeit off label) hormones that reduce the insulin requirement (e.g., Victoza of late).

    All traditional pumps certainly have the capability to work with basal rates of 0.15 to 0.30 units/hour. Animas’ pump has the smallest basal rate, with 0.025 U/hr, which has also been especially helpful for kids.
    Their pump is also used by type two patients, of course, and type 2s on pumps is the group that is quickly growing and in our mind, can use a lot of help. Possible increments for Animas pumps include all basal rates
    from 0.025 – 5.00 U/hr …

    Key in my mind is to push for better alternatives for everyone. Some of the insulin delivery devices we wrote about today – most! – are aimed at type 2 patients. That’s GOOD – 44% of patients are not in good glycemic control and only 27% are even on insulin at all. That means we need more innovation, which should help avoid big expenses downstream that can emerge when patients do not have optimal insulin management (for example, if they take only basal insulin when their beta cells are burned out, which happens over time). So I”m glad to see this innovation and some regulatory approvals, and will be psyched for everyone to see the launches. We’ll keep a close eye on the artificial pancreas though, no doubt about it….that will be game-changing for us type 1s (and some type 2s!) and we can’t wait.

  5. riva
    riva August 1, 2011 at 9:36 am | | Reply

    Thanks Kelly. I agree, t2s need major help especially around taking insulin, it’s just I’m still waiting for that credit card size insulin patch that delivers micro units LOL!

  6. kelly close
    kelly close August 1, 2011 at 8:30 pm | | Reply

    US TOO RIVA! Can’t wait to hear your thoughts from AADE …. and from the UN meeting….

  7. Scott K. Johnson
    Scott K. Johnson August 1, 2011 at 8:44 pm | | Reply

    I love seeing all of this innovation. While it doesn’t directly benefit me, as someone living with type 1 diabetes, it is the new thoughts and ways to use these devices that excites me.

    We need to see more options for pumps in order to keep the product evolving.

    Thanks for the great post Kelly! Love all of the work you and your group does. Thank you!

  8. Gil DePaula
    Gil DePaula August 3, 2011 at 5:42 pm | | Reply

    This is a very cool article! Some great technology in these wearable devices!

    Kelly,
    If this or other studies about mixing insulin and symlin is successful (http://www.diabetesmine.com/2011/05/newsflash-jdrf-amylin-to-study-insulin-symlin-mix.html), then Pancreum could deliver 3 hormones (in 2 reservoirs) while continuously monitoring glucose, all in a small wearable device system, a true artificial pancreas, much like Gary Scheiner suggested.

    Al,
    I don’t know you, but thank you for the kind comment and for mentioning us.

    Cheers,
    Gil

  9. Gil DePaula
    Gil DePaula August 3, 2011 at 5:43 pm | | Reply

    This is a very cool article! Some great technology in these wearable devices!

    Kelly,
    If this or other studies about mixing insulin and symlin is successful (http://www.diabetesmine.com/2011/05/newsflash-jdrf-amylin-to-study-insulin-symlin-mix.html), then Pancreum could deliver 3 hormones while continuously monitoring glucose, all in a small wearable device system, a true artificial pancreas, much like Gary Scheiner suggested.

    Al,
    I don’t know you, but thank you for the kind comment and for mentioning us.

    Cheers,
    Gil

  10. LL
    LL August 4, 2011 at 9:40 pm | | Reply

    These are all very exciting, however, HMO’s like mine won’t even cover Omnipods. In fact, they barely cover traditional pumps. So it’s just about hopeless to even sit around and wait for these innovative pumping devices to show up here. I feel like my state exists in the dark ages.

  11. Simon
    Simon August 4, 2011 at 11:02 pm | | Reply

    Why so many efforts to make discposable devices? Make more money out of bankrupt social security systems in Europe?

  12. vanessa
    vanessa July 31, 2012 at 4:08 am | | Reply

    Hi, am mom to a 7 year son who is type 1.he is using the medtronic pump.but cant wait for the artifical pancreas.Amm glad that so much is done for diabetics.

  13. Simon
    Simon April 24, 2013 at 10:17 am | | Reply

    And… how many patch pumps are out there, really (I mean really) being reimbursed? – In Europe: One. The Omnipod system. – And I would make a bet here and today that it will stay the only one for at least 2-3 more years. – Go check it out at http://www.mylife-diabetescare.com

    1. Guilherme "Gil" de Paula
      Guilherme "Gil" de Paula April 24, 2013 at 9:06 pm | | Reply

      Hi Simon,
      The reason why OmniPod is the only patch pump “out there” being reimbursed is because, well, it’s the only patch pump “out there” (available for sale). :)
      I think Cellnovo is not a patch/tubeless pump. It seems to be a tubed pump with a short tube.

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