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20 Responses

  1. Scott S
    Scott S April 14, 2010 at 7:09 am | | Reply

    I disagree with David Kliff (he’s been wrong before!) because I don’t believe the the Solo is too complicated, especially for the core audience, which is not brand new pump wearers, but seasoned pump wearers who will be replacing an out-of-warranty pump, and want some of these new features. I should add that you missed a key feature, too! The Solo pump features the ability to bolus without the remote. For anyone who’s lost a TV remote, or left their cell phone at home, your meal out won’t be ruined by the inability to bolus … you can simply press a button on the Solo patch itself!

  2. Greg C
    Greg C April 14, 2010 at 7:48 am | | Reply

    If you bolus using just the Solo patch, the handheld does not keep track of these. The original version does not include a glucose meter in the handheld, but I assume Roche will change that quickly. When taking the Solo off the shower, how is the canula port protected? And last but certainly not least, does Medingo/Roche have the capability to produce the Solo in mass quantities. This is something that hurt Insulet in the first couple years. Having more competition is always good for the consumer/patient, but I see Roche going through some growing pains in the next few years

  3. David
    David April 14, 2010 at 9:12 am | | Reply

    I haven’t figured out any reason to remove the micropump when showering. If not done already, Medingo absolutely must enable the micropump to relay on-board bolus info to the remote when it next comes into range. I wonder if the PEP trial is still on track?

    Did David K witness the Solo in action? Is the manual inserter method more complicated than a tubed pump’s? It appears that the the cannula itself is a separate piece that is loaded into the inserter. A learning curve initially to learn the system but after that, what’s the big deal?

    I wonder how much cost savings can be achieved with re-usable electronics. If Solo can offer substantial cost savings over Omnipod, I’d be happy to learn a more complicated system if it is reliable. For some, the more waterproof design of Omni will be a factor and I consider Omni’s ergonomics and menu navigation the best out there but I fall down like a stunned horse every time I contemplate the cost.

  4. tmana
    tmana April 14, 2010 at 9:38 am | | Reply

    This is a bit out of my league (closest I’ve come IRL is dropping down through the menus of a OneTouch UltraSmart glucometer and trying to do large-number increments one unit at the time), but your comment about the menus has me wondering… how difficult would it be to put an iPhone-like interface, menu system, and touch screen on a pump controller, with a protective cover to minimize the possibility of accidentally changing the information one had entered (and/or reprogramming the pump’s functions)?

    For FDA regulatory reasons, the system would not have to be able to wirelessly connect to iPhones or any non-secure data device (though in that case, a physical data connection would be needed) — the key is just the usability factor. And maybe some built-in functions with some real-life, auto-recalculate-based-on-the-most-recent-input capabilties for situations such as “I left half my lunch on the plate” and “I went back for seconds”? (Save Scott K. Johnson from having to do the extra math, eh?)

  5. mcityrk
    mcityrk April 14, 2010 at 10:44 am | | Reply

    With Insulet’s market cap at over 500M, for Roche to get Medingo at 160M seems like a steal …. if the system works as well and is as well accepted. Guess we will find out over the first few product cycles.

  6. Leighann of D-Mom Blog
    Leighann of D-Mom Blog April 14, 2010 at 10:55 am | | Reply

    Will it be Mac compatible? That’s always my first question.

    I often hear parents wondering when considering the OmniPod if they will lose the PDM. I really don’t think this is an issue and the pod will continue to deliver the basal until you are reunited with the PDM (say you forget it at home and need it for lunchtime). So being able to bolus without the remote control doesn’t seem like a much-needed feature. And what about little kids, can you lock that out so they don’t accidentally give an extra bolus? (When I have visited their website they say it is not approved for children under 18.)

    I welcome competition because it will hopefully lead to improvement and innovation. Though I am not sure I would buy a first generation pump. I won’t even buy the first model year of a car!

    (Interestingly…the word captcha to leave this comment includes the name of another pharmaceutical company!)

  7. frige
    frige April 14, 2010 at 6:00 pm | | Reply

    I have the sample.
    They should really have the option to attach a regular infusion set / tube to this.
    That’s the pump I want.

  8. Cary
    Cary April 15, 2010 at 2:40 pm | | Reply

    Touch bolus! The Cozmo is back! ;-)

    Probably one of my top 5 most used features. No idea why nobody else did it. Nice and descrete.

  9. Jake
    Jake April 15, 2010 at 8:19 pm | | Reply

    Does Roche take over all engineering and manufacturing decisions in this agreement? As a large company that moves slowly, they may trip over themselves the first few years and even if 2012 is the target, it may be 1+ years after that before they get things moving with this product. By then, Insulet will have been bought and have much deeper pockets to work from.

  10. Dan Fahey
    Dan Fahey April 16, 2010 at 1:11 pm | | Reply

    Scott S said that the core audience for a new pump like this is diabetics already using an insulin pump. That surprises me.
    i would think there’s be many more type 1 diabetics NOT currently suing an insulin pump than are.
    I’ ve looked closely at pumps [diabetic for 43 years] and am only interested if’/when the cgm can be EFFECTIVELY married to the pump.
    Maintaining a good A1c is easy enough but the dangers of low blood sugars particularly at night are a steep price.

  11. CaliDiabetic
    CaliDiabetic April 16, 2010 at 6:35 pm | | Reply

    1. It’s great that the reservoir is replaceable, but it won’t help us where the pump for longer than 3-6 days because the injection site will not function optimally after that…
    2. Having an insulin pen type system would help diabetics not have to carry around a bunch of supplies to refill their insulin.
    3. Why does the handheld unit look so hideous like a 1990′s PALM Pilot.
    4. I do like how the pump is flat and small like a cigarette lighter

  12. Ariella
    Ariella April 16, 2010 at 6:45 pm | | Reply

    While I realize tubeless pumps will entice a lot of patients who have been hesitant to be “attached” to a pump all the time, I really hope that manufacturers continue to design and improve non-tubeless pumps. The thought of not being attached to my pump and having the possibility of it falling off and being lost (this happened with a Dexcom receiver a few years ago) is terrifying. I’d rather be attached than without insulin any day.

  13. Anthony
    Anthony April 24, 2010 at 2:33 pm | | Reply

    Scott S said that the core audience for a new pump like this is diabetics already using an insulin pump. That surprises me.
    i would think there’s be many more type 1 diabetics NOT currently suing an insulin pump than are.
    I’ ve looked closely at pumps [diabetic for 43 years] and am only interested if’/when the cgm can be EFFECTIVELY married to the pump.
    Maintaining a good A1c is easy enough but the dangers of low blood sugars particularly at night are a steep price.

  14. barb
    barb April 25, 2010 at 6:54 pm | | Reply

    After 35 years and never on a pump, the Solo is the first one that I am seriously considering. I would think there would be a lot of diabetics put off pumps because of tubing who would consider the Solo. Does anyone know at what stage they are in? I know they’ve said PEP trials will start soon in certain parts of the country. Have they started? If we’re talking availability by mid year, I’ll wait. If it’s a year from now, I’ll try an Omnipod first.

  15. Lee
    Lee April 27, 2010 at 3:33 am | | Reply

    1. It’s great that the reservoir is replaceable, but it won’t help us where the pump for longer than 3-6 days because the injection site will not function optimally after that…
    2. Having an insulin pen type system would help diabetics not have to carry around a bunch of supplies to refill their insulin.
    3. Why does the handheld unit look so hideous like a 1990′s PALM Pilot.
    4. I do like how the pump is flat and small like a cigarette lighter

  16. Tony
    Tony April 28, 2010 at 2:32 am | | Reply

    1. It’s great that the reservoir is replaceable, but it won’t help us where the pump for longer than 3-6 days because the injection site will not function optimally after that…
    2. Having an insulin pen type system would help diabetics not have to carry around a bunch of supplies to refill their insulin.
    3. Why does the handheld unit look so hideous like a 1990′s PALM Pilot.
    4. I do like how the pump is flat and small like a cigarette lighter

  17. MaiaJane
    MaiaJane May 17, 2010 at 7:56 pm | | Reply

    my personal concerns:

    yay! It’s flat! But wait…it’s REALLY not very ergodynamic. I tried the sample, but it’s too square to effectively be worn anywhere but the back/lovehandles area, especially since I’m thin and VERY athletic (which is the reason I Love the OmniPod, I can wear it on my arms, where it is out of the way…) It got snagged on my clothes, and poked out far from my body. Bodies are round, and while it’s thinner, the Solo is actually as wide (if not wider) than the OmniPod and a whole lot less square. None of the information I have recived, or heard about, or seen online, has been geared towards real people, let alone first time-pumpers…

    A lot of information seems to be omitted… how does the pump-cradle connection work? how is it sterile? how is the cannula protected when I tke off the pump to get in the hot tub, the sauna, or the steam room at the gym? Can I swim laps with it stoll attatched, or do I lose the ability to have continuous delivery even while submerged?

    On another note, @Tony… I use an insulin pen system to fill my OmniPod, sure does make it easy!!!

  18. theoptimist
    theoptimist August 11, 2010 at 8:00 pm | | Reply

    Now if they would pair it with the equivalent of the Accu-Chek Compact (the drum and the attached lancet device) I would definitely take a more serious look at this solution. I don’t understand why more companies don’t integrate these companion parts into their remotes or meters. Just my 2 cents. Hopefully they’re listening.

  19. Jim Brown
    Jim Brown October 1, 2010 at 8:11 pm | | Reply

    There are several companies with patch pumps in the works (including http://www.pancreum.com), but they are still a few years away. In the mean time the Insulet Omnipod system will continue to rule that world.

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