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35 Responses

  1. June S
    June S April 22, 2010 at 7:26 pm | | Reply

    Sounds like exactly what I need! I have the Paradigm 522 with CGM. I’m confused, though. I clicked on the link to MM’s Pathway program. I don’t see how I can upgrade for a mere $399.00. My pump cost $6,000 in Jan. 2008, when my insurance company bought it. Am I going to get a NEW pump, or a reconditioned when, when I upgrade to the 523?

  2. John I
    John I April 22, 2010 at 9:39 pm | | Reply

    June,

    From my understanding, you will get a brand new pump, but you are required to surrender the one you are using now back to Medtronic. Also, the 4 year warranty that came with the pump you got in Jan of 2008 will be transfered over to your new pump. Ergo, it will still expire in 2012 even tho your pump will only be two years old then. So essentially you still only have one pump and the warranty does not get extended, so you are just paying that additional $400 to improve your pump some. It is a good deal, but it does have a few catches.

  3. Dan Fahey
    Dan Fahey April 22, 2010 at 10:13 pm | | Reply

    I’m surprised there was no mention of the CGM features and any improvements to that. Is the existing CGM just that good already?

  4. dargirl
    dargirl April 23, 2010 at 5:54 am | | Reply

    Scott,

    Thanks so much for the info. I just received my Revel pump in March. I have done all my training and I go live on Tuesday. My Dr. wants me to get my head wrapped around the pump part first. But my plan is to get the CGMS by the end of the year. Thanks so much for explaining the newer features. It will be all new to me.

  5. Karen
    Karen April 23, 2010 at 7:52 am | | Reply

    Thank you Amy for sharing this. And thank you Scott for the thorough review. I have a 722 with the CGM, and I was pretty sure I was going to upgrade. Now I’m 100% certain I want to, and will be calling Medtronic today.

  6. Sara
    Sara April 23, 2010 at 8:05 am | | Reply

    Thanks for the information. I am a 522 girl myself right now. I am kinda tired of MiniMed not doing the big upgrades and advancements that the other pump companies are doing (Ping, wireless, etc.) but this shows that they are at least thinking about it.

    I am most interested in seeing my active insulin a little easier so that upgrade sounds nice. I really don’t have any interest in MiniMeds CGMS system though, so I am not sure that the rest of the upgrade is worth my money.

  7. Scott Hanselman
    Scott Hanselman April 23, 2010 at 10:37 am | | Reply

    Sara – Minimed has wireless, via meter, via CGM, via remote, download via wireless…what wireless are you referring to that they don’t have? I’m not a Minimed apologist, I’m just asking.

    Dan – They upgraded the CGM software as I mentioned, in a big way. New charts and predictive alerts. You’re asking if the CGM hardware or bio-ware was upgraded?

  8. Sara
    Sara April 23, 2010 at 1:03 pm | | Reply

    Scott – sorry, when I said wireless, I actually meant tubeless (Omnipod). :) Got my wires crossed (get it – lol)!!!

    Although, I will say that while your bg result goes wirelessly from the meter to the pump, you can’t bolus from the meter, and with the remote, you can bolus from the remote but you can’t use the bolus wizard so your dosing might not be as precise if you aren’t good at math. :)

  9. Scott Hanselman
    Scott Hanselman April 23, 2010 at 1:19 pm | | Reply

    Ah, valid points, but some how I don’t see how the Omnipod could work well given its size. I need to try one, but I don’t mind the tube at all. It gives me a LOT of flexibility.

  10. Scott S
    Scott S April 23, 2010 at 2:07 pm | | Reply

    Not to get too mechanical here, but under subtle but important improvements, Scott Hanselman notes “The motor is more precise now, letting you do basal rates as low as 0.025 units per hour, crucial for young people”, that isn’t quite correct. The motor delivers insulin via a piston, and it’s the piston that has been threaded a bit finer to enable smaller dosage rates, but the motor really doesn’t do much to refine the delivery rate, it’s the mechanics of the piston determining that. The same basic technology works in insulin pens, incidentally, enabling the Novopen to deliver in 1 unit increments, but the Novopen Junior to deliver in half unit increments. Theoretically, a pen could be engineered to deliver smaller increments than half units, but the manufacturers don’t care because they make more money by selling more volume, thus their lack of incentive to make dosages even more refined.

  11. Scott Hanselman
    Scott Hanselman April 23, 2010 at 5:04 pm | | Reply

    Scott S – good to know, I guess I was misinformed by the rep. Our of curiosity, how do you know this? I have both pumps next to each other and I don’t see it.

  12. Sara
    Sara April 24, 2010 at 4:48 pm | | Reply

    Scott H -

    Don’t get me wrong. I don’t have any interest in the Onmipod for the same reason you mentioned. I like my tubing and being able to (not sure how to explain this right) put the reservoir in a different place than the infusion site. I just want more upgrades that don’t have anything to do with the CGMS features.

  13. Laura G.
    Laura G. April 24, 2010 at 4:58 pm | | Reply

    Scott H,
    Thanks for writing this review! Someday, when my Cozmo dies, I’ll have to decide what next, so this is helpful information.

    How does the new CGM’s accuracy compare to the current Medtronic CGM?

    How do you think it might compare to the Dexcom CGM, if you have any sense of that?

    Laura G.

  14. Scott Hanselman
    Scott Hanselman April 24, 2010 at 9:59 pm | | Reply

    Laura – The new pump, like the Paradigm before it, receives the CGM signal from the transmitter dealie and shows a graph. The Revel doesn’t include a new pr upgraded transmitter. The rep said the pump analyzes it and gives you the slope-based predictive alerts, but implied that the core CGM technology is unchanged.

    I’ve never used a Dexcom but I understand that most CGMs are based on the same general technology.

  15. Jeanette
    Jeanette April 25, 2010 at 12:24 am | | Reply

    I used the warranty on my pump last year and it was replaced. I’m about 3 1/2 years into using a 722 MM pump, so I’ll ask my insurance about replacing it before I consider the Pathway program.

    The warranty gives me a lot of peace of mind! (Sometimes I’m still boggled at how durable our equipment is.. and thank goodness it is because I can’t be expected to live in a bubble.)

    1. Mike
      Mike December 27, 2012 at 11:02 am | | Reply

      Thanks for putting things in perspective Scott, yes we don’t get annual upgrades, but the machines that keep us alive never seam to break. For anyone on the fence about minimed/medtronic I’ve had my pump for 7 years without it breaking, durability has been extremly impressive, but it’s upgrade time!

  16. chris
    chris April 28, 2010 at 12:11 pm | | Reply

    Are the predictive alerts based solely on the slope of the graph, or does it also factor in the amount of “active” insulin?

  17. Rickst29
    Rickst29 April 28, 2010 at 7:03 pm | | Reply

    A very long, and thorough, comment for Laura G:

    Incidentally, I landed here via a Children-With-Diabetes email message, this Thread just won a link from Jeff!

    BACKGROUND: I have used MM, in misery, for only a few days, and Dexcom since. (That’s four years, I was one of their first “retail” customers after FDA approval.) But both devices have many DELIGHTED customers, and a few angry ones from whom “it just never worked”. I can’t choose for you, but I can point out the important differences between them, and I do have a recommendation- at the bottom.

    First big difference: Minimed ALREADY allows you to use the pump as the display and control device (and has done so for years). With Dexcom, I have to carry another gadget in another pocket. And the battery in the Dexcom “receiver” isn’t replaceable: after recharging it fails to last long enough, you buy an entire new unit. Minimed wins *BIG* on both of these points. And another huge thing: although MM hasn’t advertised the 522 or 722 as “waterproof” for many years now, they’re pretty good for swimming or an accidental dunk (as long as the buttons and seals on the battery and cartridge are intact). Dexcom display/control “receiver” device will die, INSTANTLY, if you drop it in the sink or send it through the laundry. Lots of people have had such an accident. If it’s only happened once, and you haven’t had it for very long, they *might* send you a replacement for free. Otherwise, it’s bring out the checkbook… again. :( (

    2) Minilink needs recharging (the smart choice is every 6th day). And like the Dexcom receiver, the rechargeable battery wears out. Some people have skin irritation under the minilink, and need protective tape. Dexcom’s tiny “Transmitter” sits right in the Sensor housing, causing no skin reaction; it costs much less to replace when it wears out; and it seems to last LONGER — even though you never have to recharge it. And the MM transmitter seems much more prone to hardware problems, too. Dexcom’s Transmitter is the winner, by a big margin.

    3) But the really important question is: Which one gives you reliable readings, and warns you faster when you get into trouble, and needs less frequent Sensor replacement? The possible winners are: maybe one, maybe the other, maybe both would be great, or (yikes!) maybe neither one. For people who keep their bG’s in a relatively tight range, a single $35 Minimed Sensor might last more than a month before becoming unreliable. No one, not even me, gets even 3 weeks from most of their Dexcom Sensors. And Dexcom Sensors costs much more.

    But the problem for me was, MM simply didn’t work. Not even for 3 days. (In fact, not even for two– with anything outside of normal bGs, it behaved as a random number generator, missing lots of Hypo events.) If you *BUY* a Minimed system and it doesn’t work for you, then you’re screwed — it’s yours, you’re not getting your money back.

    Dexcom has a 30-day trial, but be absolutely, positively sure not to keep “playing with it” after even 3 weeks — or they’ll say your stuck with it too.

    Dexcom’s Sensor hurts much less on insertion, mine Sensors last for 15-17 days every single time. So I throw them away at the end of the second week, before they’ve gone bad — to avoid risking uncertain failure just a few days later. (At the end of 14 days, I’ll have to wait out another two-hour “fake restart” delay anyway. With Minimed, you have to do that every 3rd day- Dexcom lasts for 7.) So Minimed didn’t work, Dexcom did, I’m thrilled with my choice. But for some people, it’s been the exact opposite: Minimed works, and Dexcom doesn’t. The technology is *not* exactly the same.

    Abbott (RIP) was similar to Dexcom, and was even more accurate for many people who switched from Dexcom to Abbott. But Sensors didn’t last as long; the “restart delay” was 10 hours, instead of two (YIKES!); the hardware was unreliable; it was less comfortable to wear; and it’s now kaput, they might never re-enter the business.

    If you can’t borrow a Minimed “loaner” from your Endo, then I’d try Dexcom first… because you can send it back, before 30 days have past, without finding yourself stuck with a gadget which cost $Hundreds in co-pays and doesn’t work for you. But most good Endo offices have “loaner” equipment, so you can probably try both. I have the impression, from hanging around a lot of forums for many years, that Dexcom has slightly higher odds of success, and when both work, nearly always gives a Hypo alarm earlier than MM does in the same person. But it has disadvantages, too, as I’ve outlined above. If carrying the the separate “Receiver”, or it’s almost certain death in an accidental drowning incident, are show stoppers for you, then don’t even bother trying it.

    OTOH, I love the thing, and you do get a 30 day “money-back” trial period. Also, the co-pay for replacing your Minilink is nearly as much, all by itself, as the co-pays for replacing *both* the Dexcom Receiver and the Transmitter together. (And you will need to do that at about the same schedule, roughly once per year. For a lot of people, Minilink dies even faster, and the warranty, IIRC, is only 6 months long.) The MM price advantage, if one exists, lies almost entirely in the lower cost of Sensors.) The Dexcom 7-plus already has “rising fast!” and “falling fast!” alarm, with a choice of rates, but it knows NOTHING about insulin-on-board. And until the receiver get replaced by a compatible pump (there’s been lots of TALK about predictive interaction with Omnipod or Omnipod pumps, even including basal shutdown when upcoming Hypos are predicted), you’ve got that drowning-prone thingy in your pocket, or by your bed, 24×7. There’s plenty of talk about future products, but nothing has yet been approved for sale by the FDA.

    I hope this was helpful. I know it was very, very long, but I probably know these issues better than anyone else- at least, better than anyone else who can speak freely about them. I love CGMS, it’s been utterly live-changing for me.

  18. Rickst29
    Rickst29 April 28, 2010 at 7:10 pm | | Reply

    A very long, and thorough, comment for Laura G:

    Incidentally, I landed here via a Children-With-Diabetes email message, this Thread just won a link from Jeff!

    BACKGROUND: I have used MM, in misery, for only a few days, and Dexcom since. (That’s four years, I was one of their first “retail” customers after FDA approval.) But both devices have many DELIGHTED customers, and a few angry ones from whom “it just never worked”. I can’t choose for you, but I can point out the important differences between them, and I do have a recommendation- at the bottom.

    First big difference: Minimed ALREADY allows you to use the pump as the display and control device (and has done so for years). With Dexcom, I have to carry another gadget in another pocket. And the battery in the Dexcom “receiver” isn’t replaceable: after recharging it fails to last long enough, you buy an entire new unit. Minimed wins *BIG* on both of these points. And another huge thing: although MM hasn’t advertised the 522 or 722 as “waterproof” for many years now, they’re pretty good for swimming or an accidental dunk (as long as the buttons and seals on the battery and cartridge are intact). Dexcom display/control “receiver” device will die, INSTANTLY, if you drop it in the sink or send it through the laundry. Lots of people have had such an accident. If it’s only happened once, and you haven’t had it for very long, they *might* send you a replacement for free. Otherwise, it’s bring out the checkbook… again. :( (

    2) Minilink needs recharging (the smart choice is every 6th day). And like the Dexcom receiver, the rechargeable battery wears out. Some people have skin irritation under the minilink, and need protective tape. Dexcom’s tiny “Transmitter” sits right in the Sensor housing, causing no skin reaction; it costs much less to replace when it wears out; and it seems to last LONGER — even though you never have to recharge it. And the MM transmitter seems much more prone to hardware problems, too. Dexcom’s Transmitter is the winner, by a big margin.

    3) But the really important question is: Which one gives you reliable readings, and warns you faster when you get into trouble, and needs less frequent Sensor replacement? The possible winners are: maybe one, maybe the other, maybe both would be great, or (yikes!) maybe neither one. For people who keep their bG’s in a relatively tight range, a single $35 Minimed Sensor might last more than a month before becoming unreliable. No one, not even me, gets even 3 weeks from most of their Dexcom Sensors. And Dexcom Sensors costs much more.

    But the problem for me was, MM simply didn’t work. Not even for 3 days. (In fact, not even for two– with anything outside of normal bGs, it behaved as a random number generator, missing lots of Hypo events.) If you *BUY* a Minimed system and it doesn’t work for you, then you’re screwed — it’s yours, you’re not getting your money back.

    Dexcom has a 30-day trial, but be absolutely, positively sure not to keep “playing with it” after even 3 weeks — or they’ll say your stuck with it too.

    Dexcom’s Sensor hurts much less on insertion, mine Sensors last for 15-17 days every single time. So I throw them away at the end of the second week, before they’ve gone bad — to avoid risking uncertain failure just a few days later. (At the end of 14 days, I’ll have to wait out another two-hour “fake restart” delay anyway. With Minimed, you have to do that every 3rd day- Dexcom lasts for 7.) So Minimed didn’t work, Dexcom did, I’m thrilled with my choice. But for some people, it’s been the exact opposite: Minimed works, and Dexcom doesn’t. The technology is *not* exactly the same.

    Abbott (RIP) was similar to Dexcom, and was even more accurate for many people who switched from Dexcom to Abbott. But Sensors didn’t last as long; the “restart delay” was 10 hours, instead of two (YIKES!); the hardware was unreliable; it was less comfortable to wear; and it’s now kaput, they might never re-enter the business.

    If you can’t borrow a Minimed “loaner” from your Endo, then I’d try Dexcom first… because you can send it back, before 30 days have past, without finding yourself stuck with a gadget which cost $Hundreds in co-pays and doesn’t work for you. But most good Endo offices have “loaner” equipment, so you can probably try both. I have the impression, from hanging around a lot of forums for many years, that Dexcom has slightly higher odds of success, and when both work, nearly always gives a Hypo alarm earlier than MM does in the same person. But it has disadvantages, too, as I’ve outlined above. If carrying the the separate “Receiver”, or it’s almost certain death in an accidental drowning incident, are show stoppers for you, then don’t even bother trying it.

    OTOH, I love the thing, and you do get a 30 day “money-back” trial period. Also, the co-pay for replacing your Minilink is nearly as much, all by itself, as the co-pays for replacing *both* the Dexcom Receiver and the Transmitter together. (And you will need to do that at about the same schedule, roughly once per year. For a lot of people, Minilink dies even faster, and the warranty, IIRC, is only 6 months long.) The MM price advantage, if one exists, lies almost entirely in the lower cost of Sensors.) The Dexcom 7-plus already has “rising fast!” and “falling fast!” alarm, with a choice of rates, but it knows NOTHING about insulin-on-board. And until the receiver get replaced by a compatible pump (there’s been lots of TALK about predictive interaction with Omnipod or Omnipod pumps, even including basal shutdown when upcoming Hypos are predicted), you’ve got that drowning-prone thingy in your pocket, or by your bed, 24×7. There’s plenty of talk about future products, but nothing has yet been approved for sale by the FDA.

    I hope this was helpful. I know it was very, very long, but I probably know these issues better than anyone else- at least, better than anyone else who can speak freely about them. I love CGMS, it’s been utterly live-changing for me.

    My thanks to Scott, for creating this “review”, and to Amy, for posting it. I had adblock-plus turned on when I first attempted to submit this comment, and still don’t see it– so here I go again. My Apologies in advance, if I’ve created a duplicate.

  19. Melissa Levesque
    Melissa Levesque October 22, 2010 at 12:06 pm | | Reply

    Great blog! Thanks for the info… I am looking at getting the new Paradigm Revel with the glucose monitoring… Apparently, it checks your levels every 5 minutes and communicates this to your pump automatically… Thus, my understanding is you only check your sugars twice a day and, of course, if you are feeling high or low (which will never change)… but you don’t have to check it for meals… Have you learned or tested that aspect to the new device?

  20. June S.
    June S. October 22, 2010 at 4:48 pm | | Reply

    Melissa,
    I have the MM Paradigm Revel and LOVE it, BUT … no, you will never get away with 2 BG tests per day. You must use 3 strips a day for calibrating the sensor, which needs to be done when your BG is neither rising nor falling. You need to do a fingerstick BG every time you get a high or low alarm, and before every meal. There is a 20-minute (at least) lag time between your actual BG and the sensor BG. Some sensors are way more accurate than others, and even the most accurate have the lag time issue.
    All that aside, I have had Type I diabetes for 38 years, and live alone, and the MM Paradigm Revel CGM has rescued me from nocturnal hypoglycemia often enough to make me never want to live without it!
    June

  21. Greg
    Greg January 22, 2011 at 4:45 pm | | Reply

    I understand that there is a 20 minute lag time between actual BG and sensor BG but can someone advise whether they have found DexCom or MiniMed CGMS to give readings closer to fingerstick readings.

    Has the increased pain of the insertion of the MiniMed sensor caused anyone to change to DexCom sensors?

  22. Rickst29
    Rickst29 January 23, 2011 at 9:56 pm | | Reply

    Greg, you should have (perhaps) noticed that your new question resurrects a Thread which has been “dead” for many months…. but I’ll attempt an answer for you.

    MM CGMS users who find it both necessary AND effective are willing to put up with the difference in insertion pain – as a roughly even trade against the Dexcom disadvantages of carrying a separate device. (A device which doesn’t use replaceable batteries, and isn’t water-resistant.)

    Per my longer post above, the Dexcom Reciever/Controller unit is a lot like the Minilink Transmitter: You recharge it every 2-3 days, but after the battery wears out and won’t hold adequate charge capacity anymore, you have to buy a totally new one. $$$.

    So far, the Dexcom models (STS, Seven, and 7+) have earned a fairly widespread reputation as being “faster to detect and alarm on hypoglycemic events”. But a MM-sponsored study, a couple of years ago, found that Minimed’s delayed alarms in Hypo Episodes are largely a result of the “noise rejection, data-smoothing” math which MM uses to reject bad data. I’ll take a SWAG that ultimately, the conclusions of that research will be used to refine Minimed’s data-smoothing algorithms. (BTW, they did have access to Minimed’s CGMS programming code, it was not a “black box” study.)

    So, also a SWAG, I’ll guess that Dexcom’s “data smoothing” code works better- for most of the poeple who have noticed a difference, and there are quite a few of these people.
    - – - –
    For some people, MM gives “closer” readings during most times spent Euglycemic or Hyperglycemic; for others, Dexcom wins. NEITHER CAN YET SUBSTITUTE FOR FINGERSTICK BG TESTS !!! They must be treated as advisory indications, that you’re falling fast and had better check, or you’re rising more than you expected (and better check for that, possible stacking a tiny bit more bolus).

    In any case, the direction of the trend seems to be more reliable than the raw number.

    MM and Dexcom have both presented plans for future product enhancements at a various times (Investment Analyst presentations, etc). and Dexcom’s “Generation-4″ device has been in PMI for a long time already. (But, rather than approve the device, the FDA has asked for “more information”. I’m not an insider, and have no idea what was requested. Besides, if I were an insider, then I couldn’t say.) They have also said that they expect Dexcom to create a product which is competitive with fingerstick BG in reliability and accuracy, perhaps as “Generation-5″ or “Generation-6″. I don’t have the exact text of that Presentation in front of me at the moment, but it was given earlier in January 2011.

    Meanwhile, MM has spoken of perhaps offering a new, “wire-like” Sensor– thinner and more comfortable to insert. (From those words, it like a Dexcom Sensor; at least, on the OUTSIDE.) This would, of course, be released with new software to derive “BG Readings” from the new Sensor.

    I love progress!

  23. Greg
    Greg January 24, 2011 at 11:55 am | | Reply

    Rickst29,
    Thank you for the VERY informative posting. You really know your stuff. I am new to this website and was unaware that I had askd an old question.
    I now have 100% more info about CGMS than before.

  24. Rickst29
    Rickst29 January 24, 2011 at 3:03 pm | | Reply

    You’re welcome!

    BTW, “tudiabetes” has VERY active forums (they call them “groups”) dedicated to the two devices. On Dexcom, in particular, no other site comes close. You might go over there and look at some of the usage ideas, assessments, and complaints– but it will take a while; when you get inside the forum topics, there are thousands of posts. Are you currently a MM pumper?

  25. Kenneth J Anderson
    Kenneth J Anderson August 13, 2011 at 9:17 am | | Reply

    I have been a type 1 diabetic since 1952. Things certainly have improved over the years. Pumps are very helpful. I have uaed a MM 722 with CGM for the last 3 years.

  26. Pete
    Pete September 12, 2011 at 11:58 am | | Reply

    I have been using the Medtronic pump for about four years now, first using the Paradigm 722, and three months ago I received the Revel 723 – guess what, I hate the new pump! There is an old Marianne Faithfull song (different words) that keeps running in my head – “why’d ya do it”, why’d did ya mess with my pump.
    For a long term “pumper” the new device is positively dangerous, especially those of us who have used the pump for so long we no longer look at the screen when we bolus. New nag screens (ala Microsoft Vista), with the requirement to answer “Yes/ No” to each action have caused me to miss boluses. New error messages such as “Motor Error” confuse everything, additional counter-intuitive steps to get to key functions, make this edition of the pump horrible to use.
    Worse, Medtronic should have provided the ability to flash upgrade the software, but they did not. I, for one, am going back to my old 722, and will return the Revel 723 to Medtronic. I definitely will not donate the 723 to some poor sucker; I would rather run the pump over with my car to put it out of its misery.

    1. dick
      dick December 9, 2012 at 8:50 am | | Reply

      Pete, I’m with you! I got the 723 because the warranty was out on my 722. As far as “improvements” go, I don’t see any. I tried the CGMS a couple years ago, didn’t have much luck with it, so i don’t use that feature. All the busy junk on the screens is awful. just to look at averages takes more steps. It’s like fixing something until it’s broken. After 6 days, I wish I’d just taken a chance with the old one.

  27. Todd Ellegard
    Todd Ellegard January 24, 2012 at 11:43 pm | | Reply

    This pump is great. The software if bogus and this item should removed from market. The software behind it is not customizable and it simply does not work. One formula does not fit all and the calculations the pump uses simply do not always work.

  28. ROSE SCHONBERGER
    ROSE SCHONBERGER April 25, 2012 at 6:37 pm | | Reply

    i am glag i read the info about the revel ( good & bad ).my warranty will be up in march 2013 so i’ll decide then.i now have the 522.type 1 for 75 years.am 78.i am a member of TUDIABETES.

  29. Sandra
    Sandra September 21, 2012 at 7:21 am | | Reply

    I was diagnosed with type 1 at the ripe old age of 49 and been dealing with it for 11 years. I used a Spirit pump for 5 years and was perfectly happy with it. Then, my endo talked me into the Revel apprx 2 months ago. Since then, I have been hospitalized twice with DKA. I am in the hosp as I type this post. The first time, I was in for 7 days, 4 in ICU. This will be a 2 day stay. I have been using the 6mm Mio Infusion sets and the Diabetes Educator came by yesterday and asked me to remove the set so she could see. I complied and we discovered the tubing was virtually folded in half under my skin! Both hosp trips came on days when I had changed the infusion sites. The last time, I even tried changing the site a second time after hours of high BG’s. The Diabetes Educator suggested I try the Sure T set that has the metal needle that stays in place. My pump is now rehooked and my BG’s are back to normal! I am hoping this is a simple solution to what was turning into a nightmare! I cannot believe that during my 7 day hospital stay, no one ever suggested it might be a site issue. We checked the pump and the tubing multiple times but never thought to consider the Infusion Set!!!

  30. ROSE SCHONBERGER
    ROSE SCHONBERGER December 27, 2012 at 5:09 pm | | Reply

    i am not interested in the revel 523 but would love to see the veo 530.

  31. Nihar
    Nihar January 3, 2013 at 2:18 pm | | Reply

    These informations are really valuable. I just want to know that Which CGM device is best now…it should be cost effective…how much I need to spend per month to regular use. What are the CGM devices available in India..

    Please any body who can help me….

  32. Bea Hammaker
    Bea Hammaker February 5, 2014 at 1:16 pm | | Reply

    Looking for help for my son. He has insurance through his work, but the co pay on the pump is well over 2,500 hundred, he can not afford this. He was diag. at fifteen and has never really come to being ok with the diesease. He always wanted to be a Marine and it took that from him. He was in school to be a mortician and had to stop and get a factory job so that he would have insurance. My husbands work dropped him at twenty one. He had an omni pod pump back then, but the company he works for wouldn’t cover it, so he had to go back to needles and viles. His new Dr. wrote a letter to his insurance because she wants him back on the pump because his health was so much better then. They ok’ed it but like i said the co pay is very high. He is “unaware” and his lows can go dangerousely low and high and he doesn’t know it. The pump was great for him. I wrote to the company asking if they had a help out program and got no response. I even entered him in a contest at christmas hoping he would be picked to get help. I feel like if he could get his health back he would be with us for a long time.

    1. kaleb
      kaleb November 14, 2014 at 8:38 am | | Reply

      Bea Hammaker, did your son ever get a pump?

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