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6 Responses

  1. Amalas
    Amalas March 15, 2010 at 6:41 am | | Reply

    I hear a lot about the potential for lows after drinking, but I have never had that problem. I drink mostly beer, which is basically liquid bread, so I have to make sure to bolus for the carbs. Usually 16 g carbs per bottle and I have never gone low. Just my 2 cents, YDMV.

  2. June S
    June S March 15, 2010 at 10:05 am | | Reply

    Hope makes some very important points. And, as she said, because the symptoms of hypoglycemia and drunkenness are so similar, be wary of hanging around with a bunch of folks who are in the process of getting VERY drunk. If you do, they won’t realize you’re becoming hypoglycemic, and if the police come because of a rowdy crowd of drunken folks, they’ll just assume you are one of them and they won’t realize you are having a hypoglycemic reaction!

  3. Max
    Max March 15, 2010 at 12:09 pm | | Reply

    This blog really helped me in providing me with the information to drink safely so I do not have to be stressed out, especially with St. Patrick’s day so close. I am looking forward to it with much more peace of mind, Thank you very much.

  4. Michael Ratrie
    Michael Ratrie March 15, 2010 at 12:17 pm | | Reply

    Amy,

    Thanks for a great (and timely!) guest post.

    Hope pretty much has it down. My experience shows that I also have to be aware of some pretty aggressive highs after the alcohol has left my body and my liver starts functioning “normally”. Moderation and lots of testing are really key.

    Fair Winds,
    Mike

  5. riva
    riva March 15, 2010 at 1:38 pm | | Reply

    If you’re low before bed because of imbibing alcohol and, as Hope says, alcohol can depress your BG for hours, I bring it up to normal and then eat a third of an Extend bar to keep from dropping overnight. Extend bar is made with cornstarch and keeps your BG level for 7-9 hours. You can get them in some chain stores or online. riva

  6. saramy
    saramy March 15, 2010 at 3:14 pm | | Reply

    After a night that includes any drinking at all, I almost always end up having extremely low blood sugars the following morning and even into the early afternoon. I go low after I’ve eaten breakfast, so I’ve learned to bolus a bit less or eat a bit more. and much closer glucose monitoring. It’s a little guessing game because it’s always different. Almost not worth a cheerful cocktail at all, but not quite!

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