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26 Responses

  1. Crystal
    Crystal February 22, 2010 at 7:21 am | | Reply

    He is simply amazing. He should be proud of all he has accomplished. Wishing him continued success!

  2. Steve
    Steve February 22, 2010 at 8:39 am | | Reply

    Great interview, great story! Found both very inspiring and hopeful. Thank you!

  3. jessica
    jessica February 22, 2010 at 9:26 am | | Reply

    i have so much admiration for kris! amy, thanks for this interview. it’s great.

  4. Meri
    Meri February 22, 2010 at 10:47 am | | Reply

    “I kinda wish I could be more of a role model for (athletes who have diabetes.)”

    I don’t think Kris could be a better role model. He couldn’t win the race because of his blood sugar…instead of saying he just can’t do it…he is learning, and planning to do it again.

    Is there a better role model? I think not.

    He has given my boys inspiration that I could never give. I tell them all the time they can do anything…Kris has shown them that it is so.

  5. Joan
    Joan February 22, 2010 at 11:09 am | | Reply

    Thank you for sharing your story Kris. You ARE an inspiration for my boys who see through you that all things are possible.

  6. Bob Hearn
    Bob Hearn February 22, 2010 at 11:14 am | | Reply

    If you talk to him again, let him know that he has inspired a 46 year old recently diagnosed (May of 09) T1 to do what he can to get back in shape again. He’s awesome – and I’m pulling for him as much as I can.

  7. Jana
    Jana February 22, 2010 at 11:35 am | | Reply

    Kris, you are most certainly an inspiration! If you can do what you do, then I can certainly make it through my day at the library! I used to have a big issue with control and anxiety about lows, but people like you help me to get over myself.

    Jana, T1 16+ years

  8. Nan
    Nan February 22, 2010 at 12:12 pm | | Reply

    my goodness!! i know Kris feels disappointed in his runs at the Olympics, but honestly…i am amazed that he IS AT THE OLYMPICS!!! what a great role model for all of us…and for sure my t1 daughter.

  9. Cary
    Cary February 22, 2010 at 1:54 pm | | Reply

    Talking with guys like Kris and talking through the numbers and what effects certain things have is probably the most useful information out there — since guys like Kris keep phenomenal records (and I don’t mean logging every BG), I mean exactly what went in the body and what went out the body and adjusting.

    I’m wondering how Kris actually feels about BG accuracy on his meters — reading his comments about not correcting anything over 180. I have had the same opinion for the past decade — mainly because of the inaccuracy of the meters. In his example: 180 could actually be 140, and if you correct to 110 — you’re dropping down to 70 (add exercise on top of that and you end up bonking hard).

    The tighter control you have the harder it will become to have tighter control without bouncing around (is a 65 actually a 90?) — from what I see as poor accuracy from the meters.

  10. Michael Hoskins
    Michael Hoskins February 22, 2010 at 3:53 pm | | Reply

    Kris is such a role model, and he’s so modest. What a person to have as an example of what high heights you can reach, even as a Type 1. Stellar job, Amy. Thanks for this.

  11. June S
    June S February 22, 2010 at 5:14 pm | | Reply

    Kris, you are definitely an inspiration to everyone who has Type I diabetes. I agree with Cary above, though, who warns Kris that a 180 reading on a meter could actually be as low as 140. In the almost 38 years since I was diagnosed with Type I, I have had the worst control – yo-yo-ing all over the place, BG-wise, when I tried to keep my numbers TOO close to normal. Also, Kris, watch out … hypoglycemia unawareness set in, in my case, after 10 years of Type I diabetes. CGMS is helpful, and I wear one myself, but I think CGMS systems have trouble tracking PRECIPITOUS drops in BG more than they do slower BG drops, and of course one’s BG drops quickly during intensive exercise. I’m rooting for you for the 50 K!

  12. Cathy
    Cathy February 22, 2010 at 6:21 pm | | Reply

    Wonderful interview! Kris is such a breath of fresh air… I saw him on the today show and the picture of his ABBS!! WOW!!

    Kris congrats on the great A1C’s and for sharing your numbers!

    God Bless!

  13. pking
    pking February 22, 2010 at 10:07 pm | | Reply

    Seems like Kris could use some coaching from the folks at Team Type 1 – they’ve made huge strides in managing BGs while doing long distance/duration races. It is simply amazing to be able to compete at the olympic level as a type 1, but its great that there are a few teams out there figuring it out for the rest of us.

    Kris’s approach certainly seem counter intuitive – especially boosting his basal rates way up during heavy activity. We definitely need a good deal of insulin to allow our cells to process sugar while exercising, but… well, its surprising. I’m no olympian, but I’m also surprised that he’ll do “200 jumping jacks” to push down his BG… it simply doesn’t work that way for most of us. If he needs to boost his basal rate for heavy exercise, doing aerobic activity to correct a high BG should do the opposite. Not something I’d do myself.

    It’d be great to have some collaboration between Team Type 1 (or similar) and some other diabetic athletes. That’d be one way to get some great publicity for our cause, not to mention add to the body of knowledge about managing diabetes for athletes.

  14. HTC
    HTC February 23, 2010 at 4:03 pm | | Reply

    I like Kris’ attitude to life. Sometimes you have to deal with obstacles and challenges life throws at you. Kris sure knows how to do just that. Competing at olympic level with diabetes certaily exemplifies a “can do” steely attitude. Being a diabetic as well, Kris has got a good grip on his calorific requirements on a daily basis which is very important as far as good diabetic control is concerned.

    Matching insulin requirements with that level of physical activity such as running a 30k race can be pretty tricky but I’m sure as time goes on, Kris will get the margin of BG control right for his races.

    Good luck, Kris and keep it up.

  15. joe
    joe February 23, 2010 at 5:33 pm | | Reply

    I admire Kris’ attitude. Sometimes in life. you have to learn to deal with challenges and obstacles. Kris has done this pretty well. He has zest with a “can-do” steely mentality which goes a long way when dealing with a medical problem like diabetes.

    He has a very good grasp of his daily calorific requirements and knows how to adjust for his extreme level of physical activity. Getting the margin of BG control with Insulin for a strenous activity like a 30K run can be tricky but I’m sure with time, he will get it right.

    Good luck, Kris and keep it up.

  16. laurie
    laurie February 24, 2010 at 3:00 pm | | Reply

    Just the fact that Kris never gives up is reason enough to be a great role model. As a parent, it’s not always about winning with in what we want to teach our kids – in fact, there sometimes are better lessons in getting back up in finishing the race even though you know you aren’t going to win. Kris, you’re awesome. Thank you for being exactly who you are! You represent our diabetes community so well.

  17. Shelley Reilly
    Shelley Reilly February 24, 2010 at 3:10 pm | | Reply

    This is so wonderful. My grandson is 10 with JDRF and just wants to know he can be as normal as everyone else. Good luck and luck for all who have this disease. We need a cure!

  18. Kim
    Kim February 25, 2010 at 11:00 pm | | Reply

    Kris, whether you get a medal or not YOU are in inspiration to ALL Kids and ADULTS with Type 1 diabetes. My daughter is almost 7, she’s had diabetes for over 4 years. You are a hero to her. Having a low during that race shows our kids that diabetes can throw you a punch, it can pop up at any time, anyplace and TRY to knock you down, but you don’t have to let it. by getting up after you got glucose and finishing that race you showed our kids what a HERO you are! I’m PROUD to say my child looks up to you! I’m proud to say Kris Freeman is from NH.. I hope one day my little girl can meet you! You are MOST DEFINITELY A ROLE MODEL FOR KIDS AND ADULTS WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES!!

  19. Carla
    Carla February 25, 2010 at 11:04 pm | | Reply

    I agree. To be in the Olympics is such an accomplishment that while Kris didn’t lead the pack there, he is leading the pack for Type I’s everywhere!

    I hope Kris reads these comments and knows that we are in awe of his efforts! 45th in the WORLD is one heck of an achievement!

  20. Florian
    Florian February 26, 2010 at 10:49 am | | Reply

    Great interview and congratulations Kris on what you have done and accomplished.

  21. The Accuracy of Glucometers
    The Accuracy of Glucometers February 26, 2010 at 12:39 pm |

    [...] “I don’t take a corrective bolus if I’m at 180 or lower.  My doctor and I believe that the enemy of good control can be great control… meaning if you’re at 170 and correct, then you often drop down to 70, and then treat and bounce back up. It becomes a yo-yo effect.” -Kris Freeman, on Diabetes Mine [...]

  22. becky
    becky February 27, 2010 at 1:56 pm | | Reply

    You are awesome Kris!!!My son is inspired by you and your
    determination.I have taught him to be the same way.NEVER
    give up,NEVER let go of your dreams!!!NEVER let anyone tell
    you it can’t be done because there is always a way!!Excellent
    race,and lots courage to finish when you knew you wouldn’t win!!
    Just know that there are so many kids with T1 that are watching
    you!!

  23. Scott K. Johnson
    Scott K. Johnson March 6, 2010 at 1:57 pm | | Reply

    Amy, I am loving these interviews. And Kris, you are TOTALLY a role model and inspiration to so many of us.

    I love the line about “the enemy of good control is great control”.

  24. Devin Rettke
    Devin Rettke April 8, 2010 at 11:38 pm | | Reply

    Kris I want to tell you that you are a role model already…..I am a 15 year old boy living with diabetes. At the age of 11 I started running triathlons to show others that “I could do it”. I have since competed in two National Youth Elite Triathlons Championships along with 30+ adult sprint triathlons. I am running my first Olympic Distance Triathlon this year in May at the Honolulu Triathlon. I am traveling to Boston this summer to help Gary Hall work with children who also have this disease. I am running the Cohasset triathlon with a diabetic team and I am going to give it my all to make them proud of me! It is people like you that give me inspiration and keep me going and believing in myself. Aloha, Devin

  25. Devin Rettke
    Devin Rettke April 8, 2010 at 11:40 pm | | Reply

    Kris I want to tell you that you are a role model already…..I am a 15 year old boy living with diabetes. At the age of 11 I started running triathlons to show others that “I could do it”. I have since competed in two National Youth Elite Triathlons Championships along with 30+ adult sprint triathlons. I am running my first Olympic Distance Triathlon this year in May at the Honolulu Triathlon. I am traveling to Boston this summer to help Gary Hall work with children who also have this disease. I am running the Cohasset triathlon with a diabetic team and I am going to give it my all to make them proud of me! It is people like you that give me inspiration and keep me going and believing in myself.
    Aloha, Devin

  26. Carlos
    Carlos July 20, 2011 at 3:57 pm | | Reply

    I like Kris’ attitude to life. He knows how to deal with obstacles and challenges that are thrown at him. Competing at the Olympic level with diabetes certaily exemplifies a “can do” steely attitude.

    He has given my me and my friends inspiration to do things I would never think me or my friends can do.

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