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14 Responses

  1. Susannah Fox
    Susannah Fox September 21, 2009 at 6:46 am | | Reply

    Thanks, Amy! I loved watching the tweets go by from the Mayo conference, but it’s posts like this that really give meaning to the event for those of us who couldn’t attend.

    Maggie Breslin’s insight about conversation resonates with something Deborah Peel of Patient Privacy Rights said on Friday at the Health Information Technology Policy meeting here in DC:

    “The health care system isn’t even a system; it is a fuzzy, incomplete picture or approximation derived from data amassed from billions of two-person encounters.”

    She went on to make a case for an extreme position on patient control over data which Deven McGraw of CDT.org argued would be more hurtful than helpful to consumer rights and privacy concerns. However, I liked how Dr. Peel set out her mission: enable the doctor-patient conversation.

  2. Compliance vs. Compassion | Diabetes Battle

    [...] Go here to see the original: Compliance vs. Compassion [...]

  3. k2
    k2 September 21, 2009 at 7:22 am | | Reply

    When Doctors, CDE’s, Nurse Practioners, & Nurses talk TO and WITH the patient instead of AT,it makes a world difference.
    Kelly K

  4. Traci Wennerholm
    Traci Wennerholm September 21, 2009 at 9:36 am | | Reply

    It makes a huge difference when a caregiver is empathetic versus sympathetic. While a doctor cannot step into every patients’ shoes and know exactly how they live day in and day out, they need to understand that we all live. And diabetes isn’t 100% of our day. It’s all part of the juggling act that includes family, career, life, and even school. We tell our caregivers all the time “give us some real world help, not textbook help.” When you have a person who truly cares and can give you meaningful applicable advice, it makes all the difference in the world.

  5. Michael Ratrie
    Michael Ratrie September 21, 2009 at 10:26 am | | Reply

    Makes me think back to when I had appointments with my first doctor of internal medicine in the 70′s.

    He always made time to discuss what seemed to be EVERYTHING, not just my diabetes. We talked about work, college, family life, what gave me stress, what made things easier, etc. He would take a picture of me and used it as part of his analysis of my condition along w/my logs, BP, heart rate, weight, etc.

    Of course, then we had poor tools to manage the disease, now we have better tools but less time to sit down and talk about the BIGGER picture.

    Fair Winds,
    Mike

  6. Colleen
    Colleen September 21, 2009 at 2:32 pm | | Reply

    I am (getting Compassion and Conversation from their doctor or CDE when they need it most) and I consider myself lucky. It’s mostly my PCP. I’ve only seen my new CDE twice.
    But, we live in a small town. I see my PCP in other places (and have never asked her a medical question out of her office).

    (hee, hee – my captcha is “podding man.” Since it’s your site you’d think it would be woman?!)

  7. Bob Fenton
    Bob Fenton September 21, 2009 at 3:55 pm | | Reply

    Thanks Amy for another post on the conference. Some in the medical community are beginning to realize that it takes two – the doctor and patient to generate success in the treatment for anything, but it seems like some problems like diabetes – that this becomes more important than ever.

    It is surprising what can be accomplished when the PCP takes time to really talk with the patient and not at them. However, lets not forget the patient. Too many patients are looking for too little from their doctor and want the quick fix and be out of the doctors office. A doctor can not effectively treat a silent patient. A patient does not need to know everything about patients rights or empowerment, but being silent will not allow the doctor to preform their services effectively.

    Thank you for your insights.

    Bob

  8. Chris
    Chris September 21, 2009 at 6:20 pm | | Reply

    The level of compassion that I have with my current Endo is at a level that I never had with a doctor of any form. The main reason why? She is a type 1 on the same exact insulin pump as me. I feel blessed that I am able to have an Endo that actually lives with the same ups and downs as I do. I think compassion is key and not just tell a patient what to do because you went to college for 6 more years then I did.

  9. Lauren K
    Lauren K September 21, 2009 at 6:55 pm | | Reply

    As one of my instructors says, doctors should say patients are “adherent/non-adherent to therapy” instead of “complaint/noncomplaint.”

    I have not yet run across a type 1 endo for myself, but I would trust a doctor who has been a type 1 diabetic for a year more than a non-diabetic endocrinologist with forty years of practice under her belt. Some things can’t be understood from the outside, and being sick is one of them. Many can show compassion, but few can understand.

  10. Steve
    Steve September 25, 2009 at 7:09 am | | Reply

    Great article highlighting an important point. Talking to patients in a dogmatic, pedantic, condescending manner is not an effective behavior change strategy. Physicians have traditionally seen themselves as a parent figure treating patients like errant children.

    As a psychologist I see this in my own diabetic challenges. In moving to the Seattle area I’m with my third physician and have finally found an endocronologist who treats me like an adult with diabetes rather than a disease attached to a recalcitrant non compliant human being. The first two nit picked when I had a hamburger scolding me about diet and not focusing that my A1c has been 6.1 or less for over 5 years.

    Until doctors see adult patients as adults and interact as such we will be treated as disobedient children. My advice…..don’t put up with it keep changing doctors until you find one that treats you well medically and humanly.

  11. Vicki
    Vicki September 27, 2009 at 7:50 pm | | Reply

    I have a great doctor. He will discuss anything I feel the need to discuss. If he doesn’t have an answer off the top of his head he will leave the room and go research the question. So far I have never left his office without an answer to any question I have posed. He does not have diabetes but he certainly seems to realize the strain it can pose on a person. Some of his answers have been a little far reaching but so far they have worked well for me. He is entirely cognizant of the difficulties my lifestyle poses in addition to the diabetes and he works with me to overcome the particular difficulties they pose.

  12. Scott K. Johnson
    Scott K. Johnson October 6, 2009 at 6:59 pm | | Reply

    I like the idea of the conversation. It makes sense, and hopefully brings both people closer to the same level.

  13. CD
    CD November 1, 2009 at 10:46 pm | | Reply

    As a psychologist I see this in my own diabetic challenges. In moving to the Seattle area I’m with my third physician and have finally found an endocronologist who treats me like an adult with diabetes rather than a disease attached to a recalcitrant non compliant human being. The first two nit picked when I had a hamburger scolding me about diet and not focusing that my A1c has been 6.1 or less for over 5 years.

  14. hiii
    hiii February 17, 2013 at 11:06 am | | Reply

    NICE BLOG

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