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16 Responses

  1. Jane Burton
    Jane Burton July 10, 2009 at 8:00 am | | Reply

    I enjoyed your article. My mother was not diabetic but had other health issues which included great physical pain. She taught us that we could have a fruitful, productive and happy life in spite of pain and suffering. She was oh, so right on.

    I am a type 2 diabetic, brain damaged, born with spina bifida, a rare thyroid gland, two steel knees and steel clips in my lower spine.

    The great physical pain has never been my issue, even tho, it is frustrating. I find that the most frustrating part of being diabetic is the delicate balance that we diabetics must always strive for.

    Your article brought a smile to my face. My father lost a leg in a farm accident. He taught us that we can achieve any goal we strive for with honor and integrity and without hurting anyone in the process. He was also severely dislexic.

    Humor was also part of the formula. I have always lived by their great wisdom. I have challenges that most do not. It sometimes motivates me to work harder just to be equal to (not greater or lesser than anyone else).Sometimes I have to paddle like the dickens just to keep calm in a storm. Thankyou

  2. CALpumper
    CALpumper July 10, 2009 at 8:06 am | | Reply

    Oh how so very, very true.

    Love LOVE your Grandma’s sentiment!
    Been saying something to that affect for Years.

    “You Really want to know?” :::raising eyebrows:::
    “I didn’t think so. So, how are You?” :::smirking:::
    or
    “Well let me educate you.”
    ;-)

    Go with the flow I say. Go. With. The. Flow.

    wv: rebated Morris
    Srsly. Not lying. Since when can we rebate a cat? Yes, please, thank you, I would like to send my cat back. Much appreciated.

    Happy Friday!

  3. Nicola Duffy
    Nicola Duffy July 10, 2009 at 1:33 pm | | Reply

    This made me smile. Exactly how I felt today when I had my first day back at work after starting on a pump on Monday! I like your grandmother’s saying, I might use that one…

  4. Laura
    Laura July 10, 2009 at 2:23 pm | | Reply

    Love this post, Amy. Thank you!

  5. Kevin
    Kevin July 10, 2009 at 3:15 pm | | Reply

    You have the same anniversary as my 10 yr old daughter although since she was diagnosed in 2001 does that make her older than you?

  6. T1 in Boston
    T1 in Boston July 10, 2009 at 5:01 pm | | Reply

    I just had my 28th anniversary this week on July 8th, so your post is timely, Amy! I don’t think I’ve ever turned the calendar to July and *not* noticed the anniversary date. Maybe b/c I was a teenager and remember the end of the school year, the annual physical after school got out, and, well, whamo.

    Truth is, I’m doing pretty dang good, thanks! (yes, despite the crap numbers, daily struggles, etc. – actually, I don’t think I officially have any complications! – not that I don’t have a load of other “issues,” but hey – I’m doing pretty darn good!) And it’s finally sunny in Boston.

  7. June S.
    June S. July 10, 2009 at 8:46 pm | | Reply

    Great post, Amy! Your grandparents had wonderful senses of humor.
    My 37th anniversary with Type I is coming up next week. I’ve now had Type I for so long that I can barely recall life BEFORE the Big D!

  8. Joann
    Joann July 11, 2009 at 4:16 am | | Reply

    Oh, Amy, I will congratulate for your good information. Thanks for sharing it.

  9. Scott K. Johnson
    Scott K. Johnson July 11, 2009 at 12:01 pm | | Reply

    Great post Amy.

    That last line from your grandpa made me chuckle out loud!

  10. Funmi O
    Funmi O July 11, 2009 at 12:58 pm | | Reply

    Thanks for sharing these Amy. Really, humor is the best medicine.

  11. drcharles
    drcharles July 11, 2009 at 11:04 pm | | Reply

    You’ve undoubtedly helped a lot of people with your efforts here, and I’m sure that in becoming such a valuable source of information you’ve learned much yourself. And grandparents, while you have them, can be the most wonderful sources of inspiration and love. Thanks for sharing.

  12. drcharles
    drcharles July 11, 2009 at 11:56 pm | | Reply

    cool – you still have my blog linked :) mind changing the URL to:
    theexaminingroom.com
    Sorry, thanks!

  13. Edwin
    Edwin July 12, 2009 at 8:20 pm | | Reply

    Hi, thanks for sharing. You must be good in managing and controlling your diabetes. There are hundreds, if not thousands of others who do not know how to manage their own ailment.
    The bad news is, there are millions of others who show symptoms of type 2 diabetes and yet their fasting blood sugar counts hover in the above normal but just below the range that classify them as diabetic.

    Unfortunately, many of them do not know that what they have is a condition known as prediabetes.

  14. Elinor
    Elinor July 14, 2009 at 11:11 am | | Reply

    I really loved this post! It was very close to my heart.

  15. Barb
    Barb July 17, 2009 at 7:10 am | | Reply

    Loved your article. And your Grandmother was absolutely correct…the other day I actually told someone how I really was when they asked and about shocked the pants off them. They did not want to hear that I had gained weight since going on insulin and even more since going on the pod, they did not want to hear that I had a super low after lunch the day before and I really worried if I could get myself out of it for the first time, they did not want to know that I cannot seem to find the right balance in my basal amounts and still go high and low, and low and high, at the least change in the day…. Since then when asked “how I am”, I simply say “I’m fine, unless you want to hear the gritty details”…and so far I have had no “takers”.

  16. jordan shoes
    jordan shoes October 13, 2009 at 1:33 am | | Reply

    Loved your article. And your Grandmother was absolutely correct…the other day I actually told someone how I really was when they asked and about shocked the pants off them. They did not want to hear that I had gained weight since going on insulin and even more since going on the pod, they did not want to hear that I had a super low after lunch the day before and I really worried if I could get myself out of it for the first time, they did not want to know that I cannot seem to find the right balance in my basal amounts and still go high and low, and low and high, at the least change in the day…. Since then when asked “how I am”, I simply say “I’m fine, unless you want to hear the gritty details”…and so far I have had no “takers”.

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