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17 Responses

  1. CALpumper
    CALpumper June 23, 2009 at 10:40 pm | | Reply

    How awesome are they?!!!!

    Go Goulds!! Good luck in DC. Go get ‘em!

    Thanks Tons for sharing this Amy.
    They are to be admired. Every one of them. So many people can learn from them as a family. Not just in the D area either.

    So humbling. So cool.

  2. Bennet
    Bennet June 24, 2009 at 5:59 am | | Reply

    My new Heros.

  3. Scott K. Johnson
    Scott K. Johnson June 24, 2009 at 6:13 am | | Reply

    Amazing stuff. Thank you Ellen & Dave for all that you do!

  4. Lorraine
    Lorraine June 24, 2009 at 6:40 am | | Reply

    Amazing story. What an inspiration.

  5. Stacey
    Stacey June 24, 2009 at 6:44 am | | Reply

    Wow! What an amazing story and a wonderful family!
    Thank you so much for sharing their story :)

  6. m
    m June 24, 2009 at 6:49 am | | Reply

    Similar facial features as an explanation for why some family members got diabetes and others didn’t? That’s a bit of a stretch; some might say even crossing into the realm of superstition.

  7. k2
    k2 June 24, 2009 at 8:04 am | | Reply

    Amazing & inspirational! I have to say I feel for Gould’s on many levels, as my immediate and extended family is riddled with type 1.
    Like most adults who were diagnosed as a child, I never realized everything that diabetes put my parents through. Listening and learning from Ellen, Dave, and all the parents in the DOC, has taught me (and many others) just how amazing parents of children with Diabetes are. And the Gould children are doing a great job,while teaching everyone they come in contact with about living a fantastic life with Diabetes!
    OUTSTANDING FAMILY!
    Kelly K

  8. pking
    pking June 24, 2009 at 9:07 pm | | Reply

    Upon learning that her second child had type 1 diabetes: “An overwhelming sense of peace came over me as I hung up the phone. I felt that we were going to be part of the cure. The scientists will surely be able to learn something from our family.”

    Wow, I imagine I would have a considerably different reaction. I guess I’ll leave it at that.

    I’m not judging, but I’m surprised that they continued to have children after more than one of their kids had been diagnosed with type 1. I have to imagine that I would *stop having children* if one or, especially, two of my kids turned out to be diabetic. As a type 1 diabetic I’ve done a lot of thinking about weather I *should* even have children – passing along the disease and likely inflicting it on a future generation. It’s certainly not an easy decision…

  9. m
    m June 25, 2009 at 6:33 am | | Reply

    @pking: I would think that given the choice, any of us would rather choose to be born with diabetes than to not be born at all. So go ahead, don’t worry so much — have a baby if you want to; I doubt you’ll regret it.

  10. Lauren K
    Lauren K June 25, 2009 at 4:34 pm | | Reply

    I hope that, in the future, people will be responsible enough to get themselves genetically tested before having a zillion children. I am a type 1 with a type 1 sibling and there is no way I would have a genetic child. I will adopt when the time comes. The world is horribly overpopulated to begin with, and considering my type 1-riddled genepool, I would not consider biological parenthood. In my view it’s simply irresponsible and inconsiderate of others.

  11. Dave and Ellen Gould
    Dave and Ellen Gould June 25, 2009 at 7:07 pm | | Reply

    Amy, thank you for the opportunity to share with you and your readers our family’s struggle with type 1. We think it necessary to respond to a few of the comments above.

    Regarding the comment from m who said: “Similar facial features as an explanation for why some family members got diabetes and others didn’t? That’s a bit of a stretch; some might say even crossing into the realm of superstition.”

    Our comments went on to say that we discarded that theory after Sam, who doesn’t look much like the first two, was diagnosed. We agree that theory was a stretch and not valid. But as parents, you grasp at a number of theories as to why something like this is happening to you.

    pking said: “Upon learning that her second child had type 1 diabetes: “An overwhelming sense of peace came over me as I hung up the phone. I felt that we were going to be part of the cure. The scientists will surely be able to learn something from our family.”

    Wow, I imagine I would have a considerably different reaction. I guess I’ll leave it at that.”

    Our answer was incomplete. After Sarah’s diagnosis there was anger, tears, fear, frustration, etc. Even though Patrick had been diagnosed a year and a half earlier we never imagined another child would be diagnosed. But she was, and it was devastating. But Ellen also realized that we had to get more involved and needed to be a part of the cure. Something was going very wrong in our family and we hoped the scientists could learn from us. Like the thousands of other type 1 parents who give so much to the fight, we had to soldier on.

    One comment questioned why we continued to have kids after we had multiple children diagnosed. Our sixth child was born before our first was even diagnosed. Six months after our seventh child was born, our second child was diagnosed. So, only one child was born after our second child was diagnosed. We did bank cord blood for our seventh and eighth children in hopes that it may someday help the others. And I assume the vast majority of type 1s would agree with m’s comment above: “I would think that given the choice, any of us would rather choose to be born with diabetes than to not be born at all.”

    Regarding Lauren K’s comment: “I hope that, in the future, people will be responsible enough to get themselves genetically tested before having a zillion children. I am a type 1 with a type 1 sibling and there is no way I would have a genetic child. I will adopt when the time comes. The world is horribly overpopulated to begin with, and considering my type 1-riddled genepool, I would not consider biological parenthood. In my view it’s simply irresponsible and inconsiderate of others.”

    First, I’m very sorry that you and your sibling have type 1 – we know how tough that is. But there are a number of type 1s who have kids who never get type 1 – in fact, the majority don’t get it. Obviously, we have different views on child-bearing. We view every one of our eight kids as gifts from God and we are very happy with the decisions we made. We are responsible for our children and, like all parents, want nothing but the best for them. And we want them to be healthy, which is why we will continue fighting for them, for you, your sister and the thousands of other type 1s.

    Dave and Ellen Gould

  12. John Smith
    John Smith June 26, 2009 at 11:37 am | | Reply

    Which antibodies were detected? anti-GAD, anti-islet cell or other? I’m very curious about this…especially after reading about coxsavirus B strain which produces antibodies against it which are also anti-GAD. So after an infection with this virus, it’s very likely to become diabetic. I got diabetic this way when I was 34.

  13. LSH
    LSH June 27, 2009 at 9:08 am | | Reply

    Go Goulds! I couldn’t agree more when you say that every child is a gift from God! I have been a Type 1 diabetic since age 5. I am the only one of my parent’s six children (and the youngest) to have diabetes. I have one brother who is “fighting it off”, but is obviously not a Type 1. My parents both lived to age 80 (my father died just this year) and they do/did not have diabetes. As far as I know, none of my grandparents did, either. I have two sons (the youngest is now 20) and neither of them have diabetes. I would say genetics had little to do with my diagnosis. I have often wondered if there was a “reason”. I am just glad I was born after the discovery of insulin and the other advances in medicine.

  14. misskitty5
    misskitty5 June 27, 2009 at 10:54 am | | Reply

    I hope others will talk about those Type 1′s who were diagnosed in adulthood. I was diagnosed at age 49, hospitalized w/ diabetic ketoacidosis. There was some confusion as to whether treat me as type 1 or 2. I was a borderline Type 1 / type 1.5 or LADA.
    since diabetes is an autoimmune disease (autoimmune disease run in pairs), there should be a discussion as to what the pair is and how it affects the diabetes.

    Thank you, LSH for your comments! Way to go!

  15. Sarah
    Sarah June 27, 2009 at 5:25 pm | | Reply

    Dear Ellen and Dave,

    I congratulate you on your many accomplishments! You were remarkably gracious and courteous in your response to several of the previous comments–I am not sure I could be mature. :) I have two children, ages 5 and 3, with type 1 diabetes. You are an inspiring family! Thank you.

  16. Kevin Melady
    Kevin Melady July 10, 2012 at 1:01 pm | | Reply

    Great Job

  17. Kevin Melady
    Kevin Melady July 10, 2012 at 1:12 pm | | Reply

    Great Job Gould Family- we are in Canada – have 4 children & the third just diagnosed a month ago. our first, Maddie was diagnosed just before her first birthday & now is 16 . our second Luke was diagnosed 10 years later & now 15 years old. our third child Sam age 10 just diagnosed. your exactly right when you say that it takes team work! our 4th child Cole is 8 & now we are crossing our fingers for him. the two older children are awsome with Sam , helping him out with his “new routine” . i believe that things will get better with technology to help keep the kids healthy- & who knows maybe someday a cure! Good Luck & take care.

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