12 Responses

  1. Bennet
    Bennet January 21, 2009 at 7:27 am | | Reply

    I wrote about these last August http://ydmv.blogspot.com/2008/08/son-of-sidekick.html but haven’t actually seen one either.

    We did use the Sidekick meter that is verison 1.0 of this thing. They were great toss-it in the pocket and run meters. Our insurance company, in logic that only works for insurance companies, wouldn’t pay for them even when they were cheaper tert by test than the strips they did pay for.

    Go figure….

  2. amber
    amber January 21, 2009 at 8:23 am | | Reply

    I used the sidekicks a lot when I was working, mostly because they were kept on the shelf instead of the locked cabinet, they were considered store brand and I could get an employee discount. Other than that, they’re not what I’d call accurate when compared to the numbers I would get on my one touch meters. A double check for a low would frequently give me -wth?- type results, either much higher or lower than the original result, which caused lots of wasted strips and confusion. I very rarely ever got 2 results from one sidekick that were in the same ballpark, let alone within 20mg/dl of each other. Right now, I’ve got two one touch minis that I bought a year apart and both give results that are within 5mg/dl. I wouldn’t use a sidekick again unless it was an absolute emergency, and even then, only as long as it took to get back to my regular meter.

    Based on the performance of their other meters, I wouldn’t use the True brand (or any store brand version of their product) just because it’s smaller or cheaper. What’s the point of cheaper test strips if you’ve got to go through so many to get to a number you trust? Accuracy trumps size any day in my book.

  3. Leighann
    Leighann January 21, 2009 at 8:25 am | | Reply

    For me, the smaller size isn’t necessarily an improvement. Considering I still have to tote test strips and lancets, which all fit into a pouch. And if it’s so small, are the numbers large enough for most people to read? My mother (in her 60′s) tests my daughter during the day. I would think that the smaller size might be more difficult for some older people to both manipulate and read.

    I’m with the comment above, when there is a meter with no test strips or lancets, then I’ll be impressed.

  4. Amalas
    Amalas January 21, 2009 at 9:00 am | | Reply

    I saw that article on Gizmodo (no ‘n’ btw) and even commented on it then.

    My biggest concern is still accuracy. I don’t see the point of something that you can tuck in your pocket if it gives numbers that could be 20% off.

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  6. Lauren
    Lauren January 21, 2009 at 7:27 pm | | Reply

    I have tried this, strangely enough. Just recently I had to buy a meter while out of town because I ran out of strips for my Freestyle Flash. (This meter was significantly cheaper than a box of Freestyle strips.) I was not impressed. The required blood sample is much more than the sample for Freestyle and blood sample size is the major thing I look for in a meter. I also doubt this meter’s accuracy. Twice I bolused according to the To Go meter reading and wound up low. Because I need to save my fingers I cannot stand meters (such as this one, and the loathed One Touch mini) that require a whopping blood sample.

  7. badshoe
    badshoe January 21, 2009 at 8:35 pm | | Reply

    I tested the side kick against the One Touch Ultra with control solution, my blood and the kids. I didn’t see a significantly larger variance than with the One Touch.

    The meter was the cap of the strip can and so fairly easy to carry around.

    They were great for vacations in Florida the fit in a pocket no sweat.

    YDMV

  8. pamela
    pamela January 22, 2009 at 12:58 am | | Reply

    If it doesn’t talk to the minimed pumps (Paradigm 522 etc.), then it’s more hassle than benefit, no?

  9. Jan
    Jan January 24, 2009 at 12:07 pm | | Reply

    Got to love it for use on the go. But what about attaching a tiny lancet to the back of it, something you can snap off the back and use. And, since you have to carry around a vial of test strips anyway, how is this an improvement on the Sidekick? With Sidekick you only have to carry a lance. Now if this were the size of a new pump, that would be exiting. Oh where, oh where is that nanopump? Any updates on nanopump, Amy?

  10. Shannon
    Shannon August 23, 2009 at 2:46 pm | | Reply

    I just tried this today after buying it on a wonderful sale. I was hoping to have this small one for in my purse. My numbes were about 20-25 lower than on my Freestyle. I tested once more with my mom’s freestyle, and our Freestyles were within 4 of each other. I really doubt the accuracy of the True2Go. I also had to use 3 strips before getting a reading. I will give it one more shot tomorrow before giving up hope on it. The size is great, but pointless if it is unreliable.

  11. Helen Ettlin
    Helen Ettlin June 15, 2011 at 7:57 am | | Reply

    Both my mother and I have had serious doubts about this meter. I used my TrueRead and was at 147. Then I used this one and was at 106. She used her meter and was at 402. Then she used this one and as at 153. How would you ever figure out how much insulin to take?

  12. Dr Ray
    Dr Ray February 15, 2013 at 9:58 am | | Reply

    I think for any one who tests the blood for three to seven times a day portability will be an issue. If it can be small from all the components it will be definitely impressive. Now I hear about the accuracy problem of true 2go. If that is existing than its a serious issue and it should be re checked and corrected. The glucometer maker should think of preparing user friendly glucometers. They can prepare glucometer that can be worn like a watch…or something like that..so that you don’t forget it. The lancing device can be thin like pen that can be fitted to the chest pocket. The test strips can be rectangular small box like match boxes. So making the device handy is a step that should be welcome…with accuracy maintained…

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