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13 Responses

  1. James Hubbard, M.D., M.P.H.
    James Hubbard, M.D., M.P.H. November 5, 2008 at 9:23 am | | Reply

    Thanks for the insight on these studies, which always should be put into perspective with real-life experience.

  2. kayla
    kayla November 5, 2008 at 1:45 pm | | Reply

    very nice web site i found you looking for stuff on our sons birth defect esophageal atresia and other complications i wish you nothing but the best. If there is any way that you would be willing to exchange links i would be so greatful, thanks again so much.

  3. Sarah
    Sarah November 5, 2008 at 2:04 pm | | Reply

    Quick question/comment: if I were to interpret the higher incidence of reporting anxiety/depression related symptoms, I would put it in the “higher consciousness of health symptoms in general” column rather than assuming it’s an effect of monitoring BG directly and patients’ interpretations of results as being related to self-worth. My thought would be: the more often you pay attention to numbers and the state of your health, the more often you realize that you feel anxious or depressed because you are more self-aware in general. Any possibility that this could be the case?

  4. Lauren
    Lauren November 5, 2008 at 3:08 pm | | Reply

    I agree, what might be called “mild anxiety and depression” is what I consider “being in touch with reality.”

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  6. | MJJ's blog
    | MJJ's blog November 6, 2008 at 3:57 am |

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    | MJJ's blog November 6, 2008 at 3:57 am |

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  8. Judith Catterall
    Judith Catterall November 7, 2008 at 1:50 pm | | Reply

    But really, is it not perfectly understandable that so-called “Intensive Lifestyle Management” is going to be a depressing process. And then you have to face that nasty little machine telling you how you are doing many times a day. With no vacation. Ever.

    For the moment, I am doing well with no meds. But who knows how long that will last. And, of course, I couldn’t do it without my meter (which I call The Leech). But I don’t actually expect do be un-depressed much anymore.

    I would be interested in breakdowns by gender and age and socio-economic status. All these things have a profound impact on how well one does physically and mentally and emotionally…..

  9. Angela
    Angela November 7, 2008 at 3:25 pm | | Reply

    I wonder about the study participants who started paying closer attention and did not report increases in anxiety and depression. Is it possible that this is simply a perspective issue? If you nickname your meter negatively for example, you’re just setting yourself up for a bad time.

    Of course, everybody has to come to that conclusion in their own time; everyone has their period of denial (mine lasted five years!) and perhaps even recurring rebellion. But it helps if you do take a holiday sometimes (see Amy’s post “True Confessions of a Good Diabetic,”) and use your BGs in a constructive way, without beating yourself up about it all the time, as Dr. Jackson recommends. I wonder if those not-anxious study participants already understood that.

  10. Mitch
    Mitch November 7, 2008 at 6:03 pm | | Reply

    Truthfully, I’m confused by this report. When I was diagnosed, using the monitor became the thing to do, no questions asked. I was able to have some kind of idea when things weren’t going right and could adjust and change fairly easily; at least most of the time. It sounds like this particular report is saying that people don’t need to ever have a glucose monitor unless they’ve started on insulin; I hope I’m reading that incorrectly.

  11. barb
    barb November 22, 2008 at 3:57 pm | | Reply

    Good article, thanks so much for having it. I’m going to put a permalink to it on my food recipes diabetes website so other’s can read it too. I go next week for my A1Cs test again and I was thinking of backing out but your article has helped me see that it is indeed important to keep following up. I’m diabetic but not taking insulin also. Thanks!

  12. Doug
    Doug December 7, 2009 at 7:10 am | | Reply

    The way i read this is that if Drs change treatment when a1cs are high the a1cs improve. That shouldn’t be a shock. It would be great if we had more ways to measure treatment success beyond the a1c. Many peoples have experiences that show that a1c completely ignores improvements in standard deviation. Surely improving BG by reducing the HIGH range and LOW range should improve outcomes, BUT the A1C measurement completely ignores those improvements

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