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13 Responses

  1. Cindy Sears
    Cindy Sears November 7, 2008 at 9:04 am | | Reply

    Hats off to you for your “confessions”! We all need to be more honest with one another.

  2. Kathy
    Kathy November 7, 2008 at 9:37 am | | Reply

    Me, I blow off exercising more than I should…I used to be a pretty regular biking buff, now it’s all I can do to take a 3-mile walk. Phew :(

  3. kokernutz
    kokernutz November 7, 2008 at 10:26 am | | Reply

    I’m actually thrilled you listed all these things which proves you are human!Occasionally I get the impression that you are keeping yourself hostage in diabetic restraints. Glad to see you aren’t owned 24/7 by the D.

  4. CALpumper
    CALpumper November 7, 2008 at 11:15 am | | Reply

    Well said Amy.
    No one is perfect. And with the big D it is just impossible.

    Continue being you, it’s what your family, friends and the D-OC love most.
    ;-)

  5. Lee Ann Thill
    Lee Ann Thill November 7, 2008 at 11:21 am | | Reply

    I ruined an entire bottle of Humalog once in an effort to be a good diabetic. Now I try to carry a syringe, and I was very grateful to have that back-up with me one day this past week… but that’s blog fodder for next week :)

  6. Kristin
    Kristin November 7, 2008 at 1:03 pm | | Reply

    I read your true confessions nodding at almost every one. Been there done that… and I could go on… and on…

    When I am having a “bad” day, I definitely opt for eating WHATEVER I want. I bolus, but I eat whatever I want (chocolate.

    When I was first diagnosed, I would declare “non-diabetic” days when I ate all the things that I “shouldn’t” and just bolused every few hours. I loved those days. Since then, my rebellions have become less dramatic, but they are still there!

  7. riva
    riva November 7, 2008 at 4:54 pm | | Reply

    I hope my message to others through my blog, articles in Diabetes Health magazine and books as a patient-expert, like you Amy, is that we can live a good life not despite having diabetes but because of it; we can find something in having diabetes that has become a valuable piece of who we are. That said, I’m no Pollyanna. I struggle every day like everyone else to balance a “life” and my “diabetes life.”

    I remember being struck when you and I went for a glass of wine how much paraphernalia you carry. I carry my insulin and a syringe. Period. When I’m out, I don’t test. I consider it “vacation time.” I recently switched to Apidra from Humalog and now I have to inject after a meal instead of before. There are times I see my syringe lying about a half hour after I’ve eaten and can’t quite remember if I took my dose or not. If I open a bottle of wine, my greedy sweet tooth emerges and will not quiet until I satisfy it. With everything available.

    We are not, nor can we be, nor should we be– perfect. In fact, I remember saying to my fiance, now my husband, perfect people (and I suffer from perfection) are hard to love, they show no vulnerability.

    Living with diabetes, particularly type 1, is like walking along the high wire. You try your best to stay balanced, at times veer off, and hopefully get your act back together before any repercussions can assault you. When you think about it, how could anyone expect living with an illness every day of the rest of your life that demands your constant attention and best behavior is doable? Live, forgive and do your best. That’s it, except extend the same kindness to yourself you would to your dearest friend.

  8. nancyh
    nancyh November 8, 2008 at 8:07 am | | Reply

    I LOVED YOUR ARTICAL THE MORE HONEST WE ARE WITH OURSELVES AND OTHERS IS HOW WE GET THREW THE GOOD DAYS AND BAD DAYS! IVE HAD DIABETIS SINCE 2001 AND AT FIRST IT SCAQRED THE HELL OUT OF ME I WENT THREW THE DENIAL STAGE, THREW OUT EVERYTHING IN MY CUBBARDS AND THEN I DECIDED I NEED TO GET MORE INFO ON THE DISEASE AND NOW YOU CAN SAY I LOVE READING ABOUT ANYTHING TO DO WITH HEALTH AND IT MOTIVATES ME TO STAY ON TRACK! BUT I DO HAVE TIMES WHEN I WANT TO SLIP AND HAVE THE THINGS THAT I SHOULDNT HAVE BUT I JUST EAT THINGS IN MODERATION AND ENJOY LIFE MORE THAN HAVING TO DEPRIVE MYSELF FROM THINGS I LOVE!

  9. pking
    pking November 14, 2008 at 8:46 pm | | Reply

    Funny – almost every one of these “bads” is sadly (is it?) close to “frequent” for me. I don’t even think about walking around barefoot, I have only ever carried backup insulin when traveling, and I eat granola bars on a regular basis. Pretty much the only thing that actually seems reasonably bad to me on your list of admissions is not testing after eating – which I also never do.

    So, well done on being a good diabetic. Helps me realize how far off I am from that mark, but at least that’s a little bit motivating.

  10. barb
    barb November 22, 2008 at 7:34 am | | Reply

    Wow, loved this article. It’s nice to find someone else that actually talks about the problems. I have way too many of them myself right now. The biggest at the moment is memory problems. I’m being told by my family that I am not remembering all the stuff I should be. It’s hard taking their criticism about it all the time. I feel I can’t help the situation.

  11. Robert Wight
    Robert Wight November 25, 2008 at 12:08 pm | | Reply

    Had to make a comment on this article. It seemed like someone followed me around for a few days and wrote down what I was doing. I must admit this fit me to a “T”. It helps make a person after reading this there ways and should really make an honest effort to change. Theres days were I just get tired of doing all the right things and want to carb out.

  12. Grand Rounds: Job Advice
    Grand Rounds: Job Advice June 29, 2009 at 2:12 pm |

    [...] if you aren’t perfect in your eating, don’t be too ashamed.  Even Amy, the queen of diabetes isn’t perfect (although her version of imperfection involves yogurt and rice cakes; mine involves donuts and [...]

  13. Bernard Farrell
    Bernard Farrell January 6, 2010 at 12:27 pm | | Reply

    This is an excellent post Amy. I think everything you’re doing is normal and perfectly reasonable. I hate that word “good” diabetic.

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