NEWS FLASH: Medtronic Announces CGMS iPro™ Recorder

A new addition to the burgeoning world of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM): Today Medtronic Inc. has introduced its new CGMS iPro Continuous Glucose Recorder:

“The iPro allows physicians to uncover patters and potential problems that often go undetected with today’s standard glucose measurements such as finger stick meters and HbA1c tests. Due to the devices’ improved ergonomics, physicians will be more empowered to develop personalized diabetes management programs particularly helpful for patients who experience dangerous high and low blood sugar levels, hypoglycemia unawareness, desire better control, have gestational diabetes or women with diabetes who are pregnant.”

Recorder? iPro? The name is rather iPod like, no?

What I learned is that the iPro is a check-out-from-your-physician three-day-wear unit, like the company’s original CGMS Gold system that patients borrowed for three days and then returned to their physician for a data dump.

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The part you wear is essentially the MiniLink transmitter with sensor all alone, sans controller unit or anything else for the patient to fuss with. It records 3 days’ worth of glucose data on a tiny chip, which the doctor can later wipe clean for use with another patient. A small plug-in device on the sensor allows the doctor to connect it to a PC for downloading to a physician software package. No patient software included.

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“The important differentiator here is the patient experience. They just wear a tiny waterproof unit — about the size of a quarter — and they don’t have to interact with the device at all,” says Medtronic’s Sr. PR Manager Steve Sabicer.

The iPro should be useful for a “broad swath” of patients, Sabicer adds: of course Type 1s, who experience the most dramatic glucose fluctuations, but also for Type 2s treating their diabetes with lifestyle changes or using new oral meds, for pre-diabetics or those with metabolic disorders, and also for clinical trials. Medtronic’s expecting some doctors to purchase bulk quantities for use monitoring ongoing BG levels in a variety of clinical trials.

The CGMS iPro Recorder will be available in February for physicians to purchase directly from Medtronic at a cost of $1,299.00 for the Starter Kit, and $1,099.00 for each additional unit (all paid by the physician).

So if it sounds interesting, ask your doctor if the iPro is right for you :)

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18 Responses

  1. Courtney
    Courtney January 29, 2008 at 12:45 pm | | Reply

    A whole lot of good this device is going to do if most the patients don’t have the CGMS transmitter in the first place because
    1) insurance won’t pay for it
    and
    2) we as people can’t afford it because the cost is too high to pay out of pocket

  2. Mark
    Mark January 29, 2008 at 1:00 pm | | Reply

    Good for Medtronics. When are they going to do something about bent cannulas?

  3. AmyT
    AmyT January 29, 2008 at 1:04 pm | | Reply

    Courtney, you misunderstood. This is not a product for patients to buy themselves. It is for PHYSICIANS to buy in order to treat their patients.

  4. Rob
    Rob January 29, 2008 at 3:03 pm | | Reply

    So is there any calibration required on the part of the PWD? And does the iPro come with a transmitter or receiver? Because it sounds like they just wear it for 3 days, with no interaction while the iPro just stores up the data. And then when you go back to the Doctor’s office it spits out 3 days worth of BG info. Do I have the right idea? Anybody know more about it?

  5. AmyT
    AmyT January 29, 2008 at 4:11 pm | | Reply

    Yes Rob, what you said is correct. It’s a “no-brainer, no interaction required” experience for the patient. Probably not so appealing to us Type 1/Type A personality folks, but could be very helpful for a lot of patients to get CGMS data without all the work.

  6. Kristin
    Kristin January 29, 2008 at 4:19 pm | | Reply

    I used something similar (but I had a monitor attached, perhaps CGMS Gold?)– for three days I recorded my every move, fasted for one meal each day, and only corrected if I was above 200— this gave me and my doctor a chance to look at my basal and bolus rates and gave us some good ideas. But I liked that I could see what was going on.

    BUT as far as I know, this was free to both me and my doctor. MiniMed did it as a promotional to try to get me to switch to their pump with CGMS instead of my trusty Cozmo. No such luck! But it was a helpful three days. If you doctor doesn’t buy this, then I suggest contacting the local MiniMed rep and seeing if you can do a free three day trial (perhaps with an older system). It could help!

  7. herbaltreatment4diabetes
    herbaltreatment4diabetes January 29, 2008 at 7:13 pm | | Reply

    Yea, it sounds interesting but too expensive for me in Malaysia.

  8. Courtney
    Courtney January 29, 2008 at 7:57 pm | | Reply

    You know Amy,

    You’re right, for some reason I thought it worked in conjunction with the CGMS unit that’s available to us.

    Totally missed the boat on that one. Sorry about that.

  9. john
    john January 29, 2008 at 8:05 pm | | Reply

    At a more reasonable price, I would buy this product in an instant, just to get access to a continuous stream of glucose monitoring data (I don’t use a pump). I don’t need a physician to review it — I can do that myself! I can’t believe mini-med is not marketing this as a consumer device. It seems like a no-brainer.

  10. JasonJayhawk
    JasonJayhawk January 29, 2008 at 8:44 pm | | Reply

    Argh, John…this isn’t for patients. If you want something you can review on your own (and for less money), try one of the CGMS systems already on the market from DexCom or Medtronic.

  11. Lauren
    Lauren January 29, 2008 at 11:48 pm | | Reply

    Thanks for the update … interesting to see how diabetes technology is being used on the healthcare provider’s end. I’ve known plenty of doctors who happily shell out for better, less invasive equipment their patients can use. However, it’s very unfortunate that doctors often can’t spend the time discussing the trends technology reveals, and concerns that are raised, with their patients. “Hypoglycemia unawareness” is one topic that I believe is neglected. Doctors have to take on such staggering patient loads that they barely spend 10 minutes with patients, especially those they see regularly. If devices like this don’t provoke more dialogue between patients and physicians, the true utility of the technology won’t be realized.

  12. Andrew
    Andrew January 30, 2008 at 9:11 am | | Reply

    Good to see continued development on their CGM devices but what I would really be impressed with is a price drop on their glucose sensors. $35/sensor is ridiculous!

  13. sara
    sara January 30, 2008 at 11:33 am | | Reply

    Sounds interesting, definitely less intrusive than the old “Gold” model…
    I currently use the MiniLink transmitter and find it usually works great, but the data’s only as good as the calibration… Do they just do an initial calibration for this system and hope it sticks?!

  14. CALpumper
    CALpumper January 30, 2008 at 12:26 pm | | Reply

    Exactly what I was thinking Lauren!!

    “However, it’s very unfortunate that doctors often can’t spend the time discussing the trends technology reveals, and concerns that are raised, with their patients. “Hypoglycemia unawareness” is one topic that I believe is neglected. Doctors have to take on such staggering patient loads that they barely spend 10 minutes with patients, especially those they see regularly. If devices like this don’t provoke more dialogue between patients and physicians, the true utility of the technology won’t be realized.”

    How can we use any data if we are forced to sit with our Endo for 10 minutes or less? After 23 years they all do the Same thing for a regular “update” appt, review the A1c #, download data for only one month from your glucose meter, ask if you have made changes to the formula prescribed last time (basal and bolus rates/times for pump) and check vitals….

    Again, How does this help me with my Everyday struggles???????

  15. Christine
    Christine January 30, 2008 at 3:16 pm | | Reply

    The problem is that without anyway to compare to your fingerstick readings, you have no way to know how accurate it is, thus eliminating any worthwhileness.

    My sensor has been off by a ton before. In just the past 24 hours a 44 on the sensor was an 88 and a 142 on the sensor was a 99.

  16. Karen
    Karen February 1, 2008 at 2:43 pm | | Reply

    I’ve used the CGMS Gold from Medtronic, and it really helped me fine-tune my basal rates, and insulin/carb ratios.
    I am excited there is now something we can use that is so small, and not as big and bulky!

    The thing I like most about my real-time sensor is that it alerts me that I am going low before I go too low. I have less hypoglycemic unawareness than I used to.

  17. mark
    mark April 3, 2008 at 10:35 am | | Reply

    Christine,
    You do 4 checks a day for the 3 days to calibrate the cgms with your meter readings,you also keep a food diary and an insulin diary as well. that info is combined with the readings from the cgms. It would seen there is a tendancy to confuse the real time cgms with this new cgms recorder.
    Mark

  18. d cocchetto
    d cocchetto September 5, 2014 at 8:18 am | | Reply

    When was CGM approved by AMA? How long has it been on the market?Also – is this really necessary? Please work harder on a cure!

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