KYN Book Update

So what’s it like to be an author?  Somewhat uneventful, so far.  Probably because most of the promotions for our new book, Know Your Numbers, Outlive Your Diabetes (January ’07), to date have been here in cyberspace. So it’s more of the tush-in-the-chair kind of diabetes advocacy I’ve grown used to :)

Here’s a snapshot of me, visiting the lone copy of our book in our local Barnes & Noble.  My husband saidImg_0008_2 they either sold the other 12 copies the first day out, or there was just one other copy, which got damaged and thrown in some reject bin at the back of the store.  Danke!  At least this copy was displayed prominently, even if the “Diseases & Conditions” aisle is hidden under the rear of the escalator at the back of the lower floor. 

Still, the endorsements from doctors, patients, and educators have been hearty and generous thus far! Check out my Vox blog for all the details on our “Virtual Book Tour.” Here are a few I’m especially proud of:

What a great book! … It helps you not only understand your five most essential health factors, but also guides you in setting doable action plans. You’€™ll find very serious topics -€“- including the complications of diabetes — addressed in a fresh, upbeat (and even humorous) style. Dr. Jackson, a seasoned Joslin endocrinologist and researcher, and Amy Tenderich, a journalist who has type 1 diabetes, make a perfect team blending academics and real-world diabetes experience.
–€” Melinda D. Maryniuk, American Diabetes Association Outstanding Educator of the Year for 2005

Richard Jackson and Amy Tenderich have really hit the bull’€™s eye by focusing on the key things that help people gain control over their diabetes. I expect that many people will find this sensible, easy-to-read new book enormously helpful.
–€” Dr. Gordon Weir, former editor of Diabetes, former Medical Director of the Joslin Clinic, and chaired professor at Harvard University

This book allows even the mathematically inept to understand their lab values and what area of their health is most important to work on …. Even those without diabetes will wish they had it just so they can use this book.
John Walsh, Certified Diabetes Educator and author of Pumping Insulin

“It’s the perfect diabetes reference handbook.”
–€” Deb Manzella, RN, Diabetes Expert for the NY Times’€™ About.com

Also, see my recent discussion with author and mother of a T1 child Martha O’Connor at her literary blog. Oh, and be sure to check out the book review and author interview at ChronicBabe.com — the online community for ladies with an attitude (and chronic health issues). 

Meahwhile, Dr. Jackson and I are taking some flack this week over not putting enough emphasis on the benefits of a low-carb diet for people with diabetes.  (This from a blogger who scorns the concept of “eating in moderation.”)  In fact, the unspoken theme of our book on the lifestyle front is to approach all aspects of diabetes care with moderation. We do talk a lot about limiting carbohydrates, but steer clear of recommending the kind of severe eating restrictions that tend to pit a person against their own willpower — which for so many people ends in binging, or creates a roller coaster cycle of eating.  That said, we probably could have done a better job of at least introducing Dr. Bernstein’s approach. Second edition, anyone?

Thankfully, Jimmy also says our book (first edition) is “very well put together in an enjoyable format, mixing a healthy dose of diabetes facts alongside some hands-on practical advice about how to best implement the proper lifestyle changes that need to take place for optimal diabetes management.

The latest stop on our Virtual Book Tour is scheduled to go live later today at HealthCareVox.com, where communications analyst Fard Johnmar sheds light on nationwide health and medical trends.  Thank you for having us, Fard!

Advertisement

4 Responses

  1. Lori
    Lori March 24, 2007 at 8:55 am | | Reply

    Amy,

    Thanks for stopping by my blog. :) Next time I am at the bookstore I will keep an eye out for your book!

    Cheers,
    Lori

  2. Caren
    Caren March 26, 2007 at 1:37 pm | | Reply

    Amy- Thanks for stopping by my blog. Dr. Jackson is actually my endo – isn’t he the best? I am happy to hear the book is a success! Thanks for being such a great resource for us on the web.

    Caren

  3. Kate
    Kate April 3, 2007 at 11:50 am | | Reply

    Amy,
    I have trouble with people who A) Don’t live with this disease and B) are not health care professionals who work with the disease; judging you on how you worded things in your book. I read what Jimmy had to say, and frankly I wish his POV was as easy for everyone to follow. But we both know it is not, and telling people that they have to cut a bunch of things out is a sure fire way to encourage frustration in my experience. So, keep up the good work and don’t let him get to you.

  4. AmyT
    AmyT April 4, 2007 at 8:46 am | | Reply

    Thanks for your voice of reason, Kate. That means a lot!

Leave a Reply