2nd Annual D-Blog Day

Today is the second annual D-Blog Day, a day of rejoicing over our ever-growing community of diabetes blogs.  Did I tell you lately that I love you guys?! (sniffle…)

As you know, there’s lots happening in the D-blog community, including of course nominations *now open* for the 2nd Annual D-Blog Awards. Apparently the policy is that last year’s winners don’t appear as nomination options, but will appear on the final ballot, so please keep me in mind next month when you vote :)

Talktome Anyway, last year, I took D-blog day as an opportunity for some active reader feedback.  Will y’all TALK TO ME AGAIN, on this D-blog day?   

Once again, I’d like to know what makes my readers tick.  Please use the comments section below to tell me briefly:

* Why are you here?  You learn a little / laugh a little?

* Are you Type 1, Type 2, or a parent or partner?

* If you check back often, what do you like best?

* What topics interest you most?

* Where do you find the biggest “information gap” between medical providers and patients?

* What helps you fill that gap?

* What’s your biggest daily D-gripe that seems like it could easily be solved?

* And: anybody interested in a DiabetesMine.com T-shirt?  I know I alluded to them last year, but this year I just might actually get my logo-engine in gear and have some made up.

Happy D-Blog Day to all my online friends.  Thanks for just being out there. In Cyberspace. Or Texas. Or wherever you are.   

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16 Responses

  1. Tom
    Tom November 9, 2006 at 9:37 am | | Reply

    Why are you here? I enjoy reading about the latest Diabetes developments. Thank you Amy for all of your hard work…

    Type 2, No meds, diet and exercise

    If you check back often, what do you like best? The articles and your writing style…

    What topics interest you most? Your articles on new products…

    Where do you find the biggest “information gap” between medical providers and patients? When I sit down with my Family physician, I sometimes appear to know more about recent developments about Diabetes. I wish my Health Insurance would allow me to have Endo as my Primary Care Physician… Our family Doctor is good, but he does not stay up on the latest developments with Diabetes….

    What helps you fill that gap? Reading Blogs like our Amy.. and others websites about Diabetes.

    What’s your biggest daily D-gripe that seems like it could easily be solved? Nothing really.

  2. Cindy
    Cindy November 9, 2006 at 10:05 am | | Reply

    Hi! I was just diagnosed about 2 months ago with Type 1 and I am 39 years old. The biggest gap for me with this whole thing is the difference between the mechanics of managing diabetes and the emotional toll this is taking. I am learning to manage the physical mechanics of this disease but I am just beginning to really feel the effects of this diagnosis. Simply put – This is not my life! I had a life established that I enjoyed and now someone replaced it with this life that is not mine. This part is hardest for me because the few people I know with Type 1 have had it for 30 years or more. They don’t understand what I am trying to adjust to. For my own peace of mind – I would like to say that I am normally an energtic, humorous and easy going girl and I can’t wait to be her again.
    Thanks for listening.
    Cindy

  3. Bernard Farrell
    Bernard Farrell November 9, 2006 at 11:24 am | | Reply

    Why am I here? To learn as much as I can, and hopefully keep an eye on upcoming developments.

    I am a type 1 who recently celebrated my 34-year anniversary!

    I use Bloglines to check daily. Information on stuff that I don’t have ready access to (new devices, conferences) are of most interest to me.

    I can’t readily identify a big info gap with my provider. Maybe because I keep up a lot with this stuff myself. Mostly I do this via Blogs and Google News updates.

    My current biggest gripe is that most of us have a HUGE amount of blood sugar and insulin dosage information in our meters and our pumps. But we don’t have ready access to this in a way that would allow us to use it. And device manufacturers don’t seem to realize what a pain that is. After all, it’s OUR data.

    No interest in a T-shirt thanks.

    And thanks for all the great work you do on this blog.

  4. Chris Lies
    Chris Lies November 9, 2006 at 1:17 pm | | Reply

    My current biggest gripe is that most of us have a HUGE amount of “blood sugar and insulin dosage information in our meters and our pumps. But we don’t have ready access to this in a way that would allow us to use it. And device manufacturers don’t seem to realize what a pain that is. After all, it’s OUR data.”

    I will second this. I cannot believe how bad the software is that I download my data into. I could fine tune my insulin/carb ratio if I could more closely/easily manipulate the data.

  5. BillyWarhol
    BillyWarhol November 9, 2006 at 3:05 pm | | Reply

    Hi Amy!

    came across this exciting news re: Restoring Sight to Blind Mice via Stem Cells.

    Obviously blindness is a Major threat to many Diabetics & another reason why Stem Cell Research holds out so much Hope for many Diabetics & other People afflicted with deadly diseases.

    *

    Cell transplants ‘restore sight’

    Cell transplants have successfully restored vision to mice which had lost their sight, leading to hopes people could benefit in the same way.

    UK scientists treated animals which had eye damage similar to that seen in many human eye diseases.

    They were able to help them see again by transplanting immature retinal stem cells into their eyes.

    UK experts welcomed the study, published in the magazine Nature, saying it was “stunning” research.

    This is a stunning piece of research that may in the distant future may lead to transplants in humans to relieve blindness
    Professor Andrew Dick
    University of Bristol

    If the results can be translated into a treatment for human eye disease, it could help the millions of people with conditions ranging from age-related macular degeneration to diabetes.

    Once the cone and rod photoreceptors in a retina are lost, they cannot be replaced.

    While treatments are being developed which might prevent or delay the loss of these cells, scientists are also seeking to help those already affected.

    It is thought the retina is one of the best places to try out cell transplant therapy because photoreceptor loss initially leaves the rest of the wiring to the brain intact.

    But previous attempts to transplant stem cells, which can turn into any kind of cell in the body, in the hope that they will become photoreceptors have failed because the cells were not developed enough.

    Harvest

    In this study, funded by the Medical Research Council, scientists from the University College London Institutes of Ophthalmology and Child Health and Moorfields Eye Hospital transplanted cells which were more advanced, and already programmed to develop into photoreceptors.

    How the transplant was done
    1 – Early stage retinal cells are taken from a newborn mouse
    2 – They are transplanted into the retina of a mouse which has lost its sight
    3 – The cells implant and connect with existing cells in the eye, restoring some sight to the mouse.

    The team took cells from three to five-day-old mice, a stage when the retina is about to be formed.

    The cells were then transplanted into animals which had been genetically designed to have conditions which meant they would gradually lose their sight – either mimicking the human disease retinitis pigmentosa or age-related macular degeneration.

    The transplants were successful; the photoreceptors implanted and made electrical connections to the animals’ existing retinal nerve cells – key to allowing them to see again.

    Tests showed that the mice’s pupils responded to light and that there was activity in the optical nerve, showing signals were being sent to the brain.

    Dr Jane Sowden, one of the study’s leaders, said: “Remarkably, we found that the mature retina, previously believed to have no capacity for repair, is in fact able to support the development of new functional photoreceptors.”

    ‘Not false hope’

    To get human retinal cells at the same stage of development, however, would involve taking stem cells from a foetus during the second trimester of pregnancy.

    But Dr Robert MacLaren, a specialist at Moorfields Eye Hospital who worked on the research, said they did not want to go down that route.

    He said the aim now would be to look at adult stem cells to see if they could be genetically altered to behave like the mouse retinal cells.

    There are some cells on the margin of adult retinas that have been identified as having stem cell-like properties, which the team says could be suitable.

    Dr MacLaren stressed it would be some time before patients could benefit from such a treatment, but he said that at least it was now a possibility.

    “Everyday, I sit in my clinic and have to tell patients that there’s nothing I can do.

    “I don’t want to give patients false hope. But at least now, if I see a young patient, I can say that there might be something within your lifetime.”

    Dr Stephen Minger, a stem cell expert at King’s College London, said: “I think this is important, superb research – it clearly shows that the host environment is important in directing the integration of transplanted cells.”

    But Andrew Dick, professor of ophthalmology at the University of Bristol, added: “As with any basic research we have to be careful not to overhype. However, this is a stunning piece of research that may in the distant future lead to transplants in humans to relieve blindness.”

  6. Scott K. Johnson
    Scott K. Johnson November 9, 2006 at 4:15 pm | | Reply

    Happy D-Blog day!

    I keep up on your stuff because I really appreciate your real-world views on things. Your ability to tell it like it is, but always in a professional and respectful manner.

    And after all, we’re a family of sorts aren’t we?

  7. Gina
    Gina November 9, 2006 at 4:44 pm | | Reply

    * Why are you here? You learn a little / laugh a little? I love the way you write. You have a lot of humor in a disease that is such a pain in the arse.

    * Are you Type 1, Type 2, or a parent or partner? type 1

    * If you check back often, what do you like best? I love the plethora of info.

    * What topics interest you most? The diabetic partner follies.

    * What’s your biggest daily D-gripe that seems like it could easily be solved? checking my blood.

  8. George
    George November 9, 2006 at 5:25 pm | | Reply

    Why are you here? Mom claims that she only wanted a back rub.
    J.k I love the way you write. you always have great posts on interesting topics!

    Are you Type 1, Type 2, or a parent or partner? Type Uno! Tuno?

    If you check back often, what do you like best? There is always something new. That is nice!

    What topics interest you most? right now, the CGMS but you never know next week. The follies are good too.

    Where do you find the biggest “information gap” between medical providers and patients? It does not seem that Doctors have the time to really spend on you anymore. Maybe just my HMO?

    What helps you fill that gap? Honestly, the OC does because so many people share what goes on with their lives that I in turn learn from them.

    What’s your biggest daily D-gripe that seems like it could easily be solved? Having to poke my finger so Insurance get that CGMS covered!

  9. Sarah
    Sarah November 9, 2006 at 6:23 pm | | Reply

    Guess I’ll add my dos pesos worth…

    Why are you here? You learn a little / laugh a little? Learn a LOT… here I’d thought I’d been staying up on all this stuff and I’m waaaaay behind!

    * Are you Type 1, Type 2, or a parent or partner? Type one, coming up on my D-versary in December (graduated college and got D before I got my D-ploma…)

    * If you check back often, what do you like best? The sense of humor and reality you inject into your writing. I read academic journal articles all day, and it’s so nice to read something relevant and fun.

    * What topics interest you most? Just hearing about how other people deal with the daily grind of D.

    * Where do you find the biggest “information gap” between medical providers and patients? As many people have mentioned, we have so much in the way of BG test readings and doctors often can’t process it.

    * What helps you fill that gap? Taking more time for myself to do all the D-related stuff I need to do, and reading about others who do the same.

    * What’s your biggest daily D-gripe that seems like it could easily be solved? I’d have to go with stem cell research on this one… seems so simple yet turned so political.

    Thanks for all your blogging, Amy, it really helps us all to support each other.

    And there’s always room in my closet for more t-shirts!

  10. Kerri.
    Kerri. November 9, 2006 at 6:55 pm | | Reply

    * Why are you here?
    Because I’m a d-blog addict. :)

    * Are you Type 1, Type 2, or a parent or partner?
    Type 1 since 1986.

    * If you check back often, what do you like best?
    Just staying in touch.

    * What topics interest you most?
    Technology-related ones

    * Where do you find the biggest “information gap” between medical providers and patients?
    The biggest gap is found within the quietest patient. An actively participating patient doesn’t see as many gaps.

    * What helps you fill that gap?
    Voicing my concerns/questions.

    * What’s your biggest daily D-gripe that seems like it could easily be solved?
    I want all the carb counts to be emblazoned on every morsel of food I see. I don’t care if it’s written in invisible ink that I have to use a red viewfinder to read it. I am horrendous at calculating carbs. :)

    Happy D-Blog Day, Amy.

  11. Heidi
    Heidi November 10, 2006 at 2:16 am | | Reply

    Why are you here?
    - Because I enjoy reading your blog. It seems to be a perfect mix of D-stories and updates on new technologies and research :-)

    Are you Type 1, Type 2, or a parent or partner?
    - Type 1, since 1990

    If you check back often, what do you like best?
    - There is always something new on the billboard, whether I just stopped by yesterday, or weeks ago.

    What topics interest you most?
    - New research and technologies are always of interest, but I like the partner follies too.

    Where do you find the biggest “information gap” between medical providers and patients?
    - I don’t know, maybe the inability to know what it is like to live with D everyday (a topic I believe Kerry wrote a brilliant post about recently).

    What helps you fill the gap?
    - D-blogs among other. Although I knew a few diabetics before I started reading and writing blogs, I feel a totally different unity here in the DOC.

    What is your biggest daily D-gripe that seems like it could easily be solved?
    - The inconvenient poking ritual for BG tests!

    Thanks for the comment on my blog, by the way! Happy D-Blog Day, and please keep informing us about D-related stuff in the brilliant way that you do :-)

  12. johnboy
    johnboy November 10, 2006 at 12:45 pm | | Reply

    Happy D-Blog Day, Amy!

    My answers really haven’t changed since last year.

    Keep up the good work!!

    J.B.

  13. Bonny C Damocles
    Bonny C Damocles November 10, 2006 at 3:14 pm | | Reply

    Hi AmyT -

    I always learn something good and new from you. You don’t miss reporting on the latest happenings and product developments.

    I have been t2d since July 1991. I don’t have the diabetes version of the disease which is usually treated with diabetes drugs, but the heart disease version which has to be treated only with nutritious foods combined with adequate daily exercises.

    Biggest information gap between medical providers and patients: the most effective antidote to type 2 diabetes is exercise which is free. Why prescribe it if it is not a money-making idea. The emphasis on the kinds and amounts of foods and the meal frequency seems to be the reason why type 2s get depressed and lose their interest and pleasure in eating.

    What helps me fill the gap?
    My being a non-conformist makes me try unconventional ideas, like treating my type 2 disease with unlimited varieties and amounts of nutritious heart-healthy foods and with plenty of regular and consistent daily exercises. Short-lived and temporary high blood sugar levels have always been harmless to me so I always eat plenty of the foods I love most. Consistent and prolonged high bs levels are automatically stopped by the stair-running that I always do.

    My biggest daily D-gripe? I have learned long time ago that complaining is a total waste of my time and effort. I should be good at solving problems. Those that I cannot solve make me think harder and force me to understand myself better. They surely keep me out of mischief.

    I love reading all your stories.

  14. Kassie
    Kassie November 10, 2006 at 3:45 pm | | Reply

    I think the biggest information gap is more of a reality gap. Providers just don’t know enough about diabetes in the realy world. Case in point: any pwd’s story about being in the hospital and dealing with outdated policies and flat out misinformation.

  15. Elinor
    Elinor November 10, 2006 at 6:26 pm | | Reply

    Great Blog!

    I’d be proud to wear one of your t-shirts!!!!

  16. Suzanne
    Suzanne November 13, 2006 at 8:02 am | | Reply

    Why am I here? I learn a lot from your posts! And I appreciate the good humor.

    I’m type 1 – it’ll be two years on Nov. 20. I’m 32, and it’s nice to get your perspective as a type 1 who was also diagnosed in her 30s.

    I check back often because I always learn something new. You even have great info. on the sidebars.

    What topics interest me most? I like info. on new or in-the-works developments in diabetes care. I often forward the diabetic partner follies to my own amazing partner.

    Biggest information gap between providers & patients? I feel that the psychological piece of care is really missing. My endo team is really awesome and completely up to speed on all things related to type 1 & type 2 diabetes, but I really don’t think they get how hard it is to be living with this disease day in, day out. It’s just so ever-present and often sooo frustrating! Of course I have basal rates and insulin to carb ratios, but many days I’m puzzled by those formulae NOT working as expected. Sometimes this leads to an emotional tailspin.

    What helps me fill that gap? Talking with other diabetics, reading diabetes magazines, and particularly reading your blog and some other stuff on the web. It’s extremely comforting to know that someone else has battled BGs in the 200s all night long and cried about it.

    Biggest daily D-gripe? unexpected highs & lows (did someone shake sugar all over that sandwich or what?!) – maybe CGMS is the answer? I just can’t afford that right now.

    T-Shirt? Yeah, I think I’d wear it!

    Your blog has helped me immensely in dealing with this daily grind. I feel positive most of the time, and I try to stay really grounded and inspired by others living well with this disease.

    Cindy, I remember those feelings just post-diagnosis — “This is not my life!” I felt that my body was a foreign entity for at least 6 months post-diagnosis. I still have days, but I feel like I’m ME again. I think it takes time and a whole lot of support from friends, family, and particularly other type 1s who know what you’re talking about. Hang in there.

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